Natural Remedies for Roaches: 8 Prevention Methods to Try

The survival skills cockroaches have are amazing. They can continue living, for a short time, without their heads. They can hold their breath underwater for 40 minutes. They can run up to three miles in a single hour.

This is all great for roaches (and pretty interesting too) — until the ugly bugs infest your apartment. Once they’ve made their way into your home, all you want to do is get rid of them. But, before you make an appointment with an exterminator, consider an organic, DIY approach. Use one of the many natural remedies for roaches to keep them away.

Cockroach

Cockroach

How to get rid of cockroaches

Once you’ve established you’ve got unwanted visitors, whether you’ve seen roaches or just their nasty trails, it’s time to consider how you want to get rid of them. You can use chemicals to do the job, but if you have pets or young children or you’re sensitive to certain products, going natural might be a better option.

When it’s time to get rid of unwanted insect visitors, look to your pantry first, you might already have some of these natural remedies for roaches ready to go.

1. Sugar

This is an example of using something sweet to lure cockroaches to their demise. You just have to add a little something extra. Mix one part powdered sugar with three parts boric acid. The sugar brings the bugs in — the boric acid takes them out.

Boric acid isn’t toxic to people or pets, but it can irritate skin. When putting this mixture down, avoid counters and stick to the hidden spots roaches can use for hiding places. Good spots are behind appliances, under the sink and in any cracks along the edges of cabinets.

If either ingredient isn’t readily available, this is a versatile recipe, so you can swap out ingredients to achieve the same effect. Instead of powdered sugar, you can use peanut butter or jelly. You can also replace the boric acid with food-grade diatomaceous earth.

soapy water, one of the natural remedies for roaches

soapy water, one of the natural remedies for roaches

2. Soapy water

If you spot a cockroach and want to kill it without having to get close enough to step on it, keep a spray bottle of soapy water handy. Use diluted dish soap so that whatever surface it gets on also gets clean (an added bonus).

Spraying this mixture directly onto a roach makes it impossible for the bug to breathe. It clogs up their skin, which is how they take in air. It may take an extra little bit to do the trick, and you still have to dispose of the roach but hey — it won’t head back to hang with its buddies.

3. Coffee grounds

This easy-to-find food staple helps make a perfect cockroach trap. They serve as bait to bring the roaches in and are non-toxic for every other member of your home. To make a trap, all you need is a glass jar, coffee grounds and water.

To build your trap:

  • Fill a large glass jar about halfway with water.
  • Add 1-2 tablespoons of moistened coffee grounds.
  • Place the jars as close to potential nesting spots as possible.

The roaches will come in to check out the coffee, climb into the jar and get stuck and eventually drown. Then, dump the entire contents of the trap into the toilet for a goodbye flush.

Lemon, one of the natural remedies for roaches

Lemon, one of the natural remedies for roaches

4. Lemon

While lemon won’t work on its own to keep roaches away, using lemon-scented cleaners around your home can have a big impact on keeping the place cockroach-free.

A clean home is the best way to avoid an infestation, and the scent of a lemon actually works to keep a variety of insects from wanting to live in your place.

For an easy, all-purpose cleaner you can make at home, you only need two ingredients — citrus peels and vinegar. To make:

  • Fill a glass jar with clean, chopped-up lemon peels.
  • Pour white vinegar over the peels to submerge them and seal the jar.
  • Let the mixture sit for about four weeks, shaking it regularly.
  • Strain out the peels and put the liquid into a spray bottle.

This will keep countertops, appliances, floors and glass all clean and smelling great, while also helping you deal with the cockroaches.

Make sure to clean your place regularly, focusing on areas like the kitchen and dining room. Roaches love crumbs and can smell food if packages get left open in your pantry. It’s also a good idea to empty your trash regularly to keep food odors out of your home.

5. Plants

Another big attractor for roaches is moisture. One way to deal with excess moisture in your home is to check your pipes regularly for leaks, but sometimes it’s a matter of high humidity. To deal with this, consider buying a few house plants.

You’ll need a specific type, epiphytes like ferns, orchids and cacti. These are special plants that work as a natural dehumidifier, pulling water from the air to keep themselves hydrated. They’re easy to care for and will help reduce moisture levels in your home.

Place one in every bathroom, on a screened-in porch, or anywhere where the air feels heavy. They won’t repel cockroaches themselves but will help take away a serious temptation for the bugs to come into your home.

onions, one of the natural remedies for roaches

onions, one of the natural remedies for roaches

6. Onions

This is maybe the strangest of the natural remedies for roaches, but it uses ingredients you’re bound to have at home right now. All you need is an onion and baking soda. Again, the food attracts hungry insects, and the baking soda does the dirty work.

To set this up:

  • Dice up about half an onion.
  • Sprinkle baking soda over it.
  • Place on a small paper plate anywhere roaches may hide overnight.

Since roaches prefer the dark, you’ll most likely “feed” more if you wait until evening to put out your trap. It’s also best to do it when there’s minimal risk of running into the nasty guys yourself.

7. Cornstarch

When you need to cover up cracks to keep the roaches away, this remedy is a great choice. Not only will it fill the space to let fewer roaches through, but it will also kill any of them who eat it.

Mix equal parts of cornstarch and Plaster of Paris to make a powder you can sprinkle anywhere. Don’t activate the Plaster of Paris with water beforehand. The roaches do that after they eat the concoction when they drink water. It’s the mixing in their stomach that ultimately kills them.

It’s important to note that Plaster of Paris is a toxic ingredient and dangerous for children and pets. Using this recipe specifically in cracks helps keep it away from everyone but the roaches.

Peppermint oil

Peppermint oil

8. Peppermint

Roaches hate the smell of peppermint. They’ll avoid it like the plague. It can also actually harm them if they come into contact with it. Spraying a mixture with peppermint oil directly onto roaches can mean lights out, but that’s only if you see the invaders around.

You’ll have more success using mint as a repellent, targeting areas near where you think roaches are hiding. To make a mint-infused spray:

  • Mix two parts water with one part white vinegar into a spray bottle.
  • Add about 10 drops of peppermint oil.
  • Shake up and spray.

Chemicals aren’t required to keep the roaches away

The question is never if you’ll see a roach in your apartment, but rather when. They’re out there, and there’s a lot of them, but knowing how to repel them and say good-bye for good means you don’t have to live with them. Us

ing natural remedies for roaches allows you to live insect-free without having to buy harsh chemicals or spend money on an exterminator. Just make sure you’re targeting the right areas. Roaches love to live in places like boiler rooms, basements, crawl spaces, steam tunnels, drains and sewers. Happy hunting!

Comments

comments

Source: apartmentguide.com

How To Organize Your Kitchen Cabinets in 11 Easy Steps

Getting your kitchen organized in a way that makes sense for your life will make a big difference in how you use the space and how much time you spend in it. Here’s how to organize your kitchen cabinets so you’ll love being in the kitchen!

1. Remove everything from your kitchen cabinets

To organize your kitchen cabinets, you’ll want to start by taking everything out of the drawers and cupboards — absolutely everything must come out.

You want to start with empty, clean places for everything. Don’t try to shuffle things around between them — this usually results in a bigger mess than when you started.

2. Clean the drawers and surfaces

Wipe down and disinfect all of the drawers, cabinets and shelves in your kitchen. Even a few crumbs in the bottom of a drawer can make it look gross and unorganized, so get everything looking as clean as possible.

how to organize kitchen cabinets with pots and pans

3. Take inventory of everything you have

Get a good idea of what you have. Sort items into categories, such as:

  • Pots and pans
  • Food storage containers
  • Bowls and plates
  • Cups
  • Eating utensils
  • Cooking utensils
  • Baking tools
  • Small appliances (electric mixer, waffle maker, toaster, etc.)
  • Spices
  • Dry foods (cereal, pasta, oatmeal, etc.)
  • Baking ingredients (flour, sugar, chocolate chips, shredded coconut, etc.)

Everything sorted? Now, you can see what all you have and how much of each item you’ll need to store.

4. Get rid of the items you don’t need

More isn’t always better, especially when you’re working with a finite amount of kitchen storage space. With everything sorted and you know exactly how much of everything you’ve got, decide what you need and what you don’t need.

Over time, you may have collected various kitchen items and you may not realize just how much you actually have. While it’s nice to have lots of pots and pans for cooking dinner for a group, you may find that you have three pots all the same size when, realistically, you only need one. The same thing goes for everything else — you may have accumulated 12 wooden spoons and you only need to have two. And that turkey baster collection? One will do — you get rid of the other two.

Get rid of things you haven’t used or have too many of — so fitting everything in your kitchen cabinets won’t give a game of Tetris a run for its money.

5. Group similar items together

Now that you’ve gotten rid of the extra stuff, you’ve got less stuff to fit into your kitchen. Woohoo!

Start by keeping similar items together and match them up with cabinets and drawers relative to their size and quantity. Pots and pans are bulky, so they’ll probably need a bigger cabinet. Spice jars are small, so they can go in a smaller cabinet.

Keep similar items together in the same place so they’re easy to find and you won’t end up opening every single cabinet and drawer in the kitchen each time you need something.

6. Put open items in bins and containers

When you’re limited on drawer space, using bins to store things can make it much easier to find what you need and keep things from falling out of cabinets when you open them.

Clear bins are best since you can see exactly what’s inside of them. You can store all of your baking ingredients in them — creating one for your sugars (regular sugar, brown sugar, powdered sugar, etc.) and one for chocolate chips (semi-sweet chocolate chips, milk chocolate, white chocolate, etc.).

Don’t forget to dedicate a bin or two for your snacks (granola bars, fruit snacks, etc.). Make bins for any items that make sense to keep together.

how to organize kitchen cabinets with clear storage

You can also store dry food items in clear, airtight containers. This allows you to see how much of everything you have, plus containers are stackable, resealable and won’t get smashed or lost easily in your pantry. Even Marie Kondo supports putting food into matching containers for organization!

7. Use drawer organizers for utensils

Kitchen drawers.

Putting dividers and organizers in drawers will help keep things sorted out and easy to find. Rather than a jumbled mess where it takes forever to dig up what you need, sort your regular utensils — forks, knives and spoons, as well as bigger cooking utensils like ladles, cooking spoons and spatulas.

8. Match up your food storage containers

how to organize kitchen cabinets with Food storage containers

It’s easy to throw all of the food storage containers and lids into a cabinet once they’re clean, but tale as old as time — when you need it, you end up having to dig through everything just to find a matching lid.

Put the lids on your food storage containers before putting them in the cabinet so you’re guaranteed to find a container and a matching lid each time you need it. You can nest them to save cabinet space while still keeping matches together.

No more digging through and trying to fit 12 lids on the same container before you find a match!

9. Keep frequently used items within easy reach

Put all of the items you use frequently in the easiest to reach and access places and keep the seldom-used items in harder-to-access places.

It doesn’t make sense to keep the drinking glasses you use every day on a high shelf that’s difficult to reach, nor it makes zero sense to store the electric mixer you use once a month in an eye-level cabinet right by the sink.

Your kitchen’s organization should make sense for your life and what you use often.

10. Store items in places that make sense

Store things in the most practical of places! Keep your cooking oil and spices near the stovetop, since that’s where you will use them the most. Put your eating utensils near the plates and bowls since they go together like peas in a pod. Put pots and pans near the stove because they’re always used on it.

11. Eliminate a junk drawer

Junk drawer.

Many people have a drawer for the miscellaneous items in their kitchen, often dubbed the “random” or “junk” drawer. It turns into a black hole where you end up placing small items you’re too lazy to find the correct spot for and once you need that item, you can’t remember where you put it.

This drawer defeats the purpose of organizing your kitchen— you should find everything quickly and easily without having to dig through a bunch of random stuff in a drawer. Don’t leave room for a junk drawer in your kitchen at all!

Other kitchen cabinet organization tips

Here are a few additional tips and ideas for organizing your kitchen cabinets.

  • Use hooks on the inside of cabinet doors to hang things like scrub brushes, pot lids and large spoons
  • Use shelf risers to give yourself extra stacking space in cabinets
  • Most cabinets have movable shelves, change the shelf placement to accommodate the items you’re putting into each cabinet
  • Add a magnetic knife strip to the wall above where you normally chop fruits and vegetables so you can keep your favorite knives at the ready without taking up drawer space
  • Store your cutting boards and baking sheets vertically instead of horizontally —that way, you can simply slide which sheet you want out on its side
  • Label containers and bins, especially if they’re opaque and not clear so that you know what’s stored inside of them without having to check
  • Add a lazy Susan to awkward corner cabinets with a small opening, so you can store things like spices and oils without needing to reach far into the cabinet and you can see everything easily
  • Limit your kitchen gadgets — yes, the banana slicer looks cool and helps you cut a banana in five seconds rather than 30, but do you really need it? Sparingly purchase gadgets to prevent clutter.

These aren’t necessary for keeping your kitchen cabinets organized, but they can certainly help make your kitchen all the more functional.

Staying organized requires discipline

Once you figure out how to organize your kitchen cabinets, your work isn’t completely done — you need to make sure they STAY organized. That means putting everything back into its proper place whenever you’re through using it. It’s easy to slip out of that habit, but once you do, your kitchen cabinets and drawers may end up a mess again.

Put forth a special effort to keep things where they belong!

The post How To Organize Your Kitchen Cabinets in 11 Easy Steps appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

9 Ways to Survive With No Dishwasher in Your Apartment

Even if your new rental unit ticked off most of your must-have boxes — great location, lots of light, budget-friendly — you might be disappointed about one thing: There’s no dishwasher in the apartment.

Not to worry! Here are some tips, tricks and shortcuts that take the drudgery out of washing dishes — and you may even end up enjoying the task.

1. Plan meals that use fewer dishes

Instant pot filled with food.

Instead of dirtying piles of cooking utensils, try incorporating some one-pot meals into the rotation. Slow cookers, instant-pots, woks and sheet pans will all minimize the amount of mess.

When baking, measure your dry ingredients first and then reuse the same measuring cups and spoons for wet ingredients.

You can also line your pans with aluminum foil before roasting vegetables or baking lasagna to cut down on washing time afterward.

Also, read a recipe through before you start cooking to see how many dishes you will need. By thinking ahead, you’ll have less to wash when you’re done eating.

2. Clean up as you cook

Washing a dirty pan with soap and water because there's no dishwasher in apartment

As you prepare your meal, get in the habit of tossing food scraps into the compost bin or garbage can. Plan to wash what you use as you’re cooking or place dirty dishes into the sink as you go.

Before you start chopping any ingredients, fill the sink with warm soapy water and soak your dirty dishes so food doesn’t become dry and caked on. Wash your prep tools as your food cooks.

3. Get the right tools for the job

Cleaning tools for dishwashing.

Toss that stinky kitchen dishcloth and pick up a few smart gadgets that will almost make you forget you don’t have a dishwasher in your apartment.

  • A dishwashing brush can handle even the crustiest food remnants, plus it dries completely — no more damp, germ-infested sponges lying around.
  • If you prefer a sponge, get a washable microfiber one that you can toss into the washing machine.
  • Silicone scrubbing gloves protect your hands, plus they provide some scrubbing power.
  • Using a blade brush is a safer way to clean sharp knives.
  • A food scraper or dish squeegee makes dishwashing easier and keeps your sudsy water cleaner.

4. Protect your drain

Sink clogged with water.

The last thing you need when you have no dishwasher in your apartment is a clogged kitchen sink.

Never pour oil or grease down the drain because they can coat the pipes and cause a blockage. Use a sink strainer to catch food particles and empty it regularly while you’re cleaning up.

5. Be efficient by learning how to clean stubborn dishes

Handwashing dishes.

For about $10, you can upgrade your kitchen faucet with a swivel tap aerator, which helps get into the nooks and crannies for more effective dishwashing.

Wash items from least to most dirty: Glasses and silverware first, then plates and bowls. Save the largest, dirtiest things for last. Some dishes, like glassware or anything oily need extra-hot water to get clean, while others do better with cold.

For example, dairy and starch rinse off easily under cold water, which prevents the residue from getting sticky. For scorched pots and pans, head to your laundry room to grab a dryer sheet: Soaking it with the pan in warm soapy water for an hour will remove caked-on grime.

6. Use the right kind and amount of dish soap

Soapy sponge because no dishwasher in apartment

If you don’t like wearing latex gloves to protect your hands, use a natural dish soap that will be gentler on your skin. For very greasy dishes, you might need a more advanced dish cleaner.

Don’t use too much soap, because it can leave a sticky residue on your dishes — one or two tablespoons per load is all you need.

Pouring your soap into a touchless foaming soap dispenser controls how much you use, saving you money.

7. Purchase space-saving drying racks

Dishes drying on a cleaning rack.

Why double the amount of work to hand-dry all your dishes when you can let them air-dry instead?

Since small apartment kitchens usually lack counter space, ditch the bulky dish-drying rack in favor of a more streamlined solution, such as hanging a wire shelf over the sink, or using a roll-up drying rack that stores away when not in use. Or, use a silicone dish-drying mat — it’s better than a fabric one because it prevents mold growth.

8. Treat yourself to a few luxuries

Man listening to music while doing dirty dishes in the kitchen with no dishwasher in apartment

Just because there’s no dishwasher in your apartment doesn’t mean you should dread cooking great meals for yourself or your loved ones. One thing that makes the task easier is creating the right mood for the job.

Pick up some great-smelling dish soap and soft linen kitchen towels, which dry faster than cotton and are naturally anti-microbial. Set up a waterproof Bluetooth speaker or wear wireless headphones so you can listen to your favorite tunes or podcast or light a few aromatherapy candles to make washing dishes more enjoyable.

9. Invest in a countertop dishwasher

Speaking of treating yourself: Sometimes, especially if you have a family to feed three times a day, hand-washing everything is just not realistic. Apartment dwellers have another option: A countertop dishwasher.

These appliances — ranging in size from 16 to 22 inches wide — sit on your counter, hook up to the faucet and wash up to six place settings at once. These dishwashers cost about $400.

Adapt to having no dishwasher in your apartment

While living in an apartment with no dishwasher can seem challenging at first, the transition to a wash-as-you-go lifestyle is easier when you plan ahead, use the right tools and shift your mindset.

The post 9 Ways to Survive With No Dishwasher in Your Apartment appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

Clutter vs. Hoarding: When to Worry About Your Roommate

Living styles can vary greatly from one person to the next, especially when it comes to cleaning and tidiness. Many times it is beneficial to discuss these traits before moving in with a roommate — if you’re a self-described “neat freak,” you might find it easier if your cohabitant is on the more organized side of things as well. That’s not to say that clean and messy roommates can’t successfully live together.

Maybe your roommate is just messy, a sentimental collector or a little bit of a packrat. If this is the case, there are plenty of ways to work through your differences and find a way to live peacefully together. But when is your roommate’s mess potentially the sign of hoarding?

hoarding

Messy and disorganized

If you’re noticing more mess than usual or if it seems like your roommate is struggling to keep up with normal housework, it might be a sign that something else is going on in their life that is causing stress or taking all of their attention.

Stress and other bigger issues going on outside your home can often disrupt normal patterns, with cleaning and organization falling to the bottom of the priority list.

If personal items are stacking up on tables and counters, more than a day of dirty dishes are piling up in the sink or you notice some extra loads of unwashed laundry from your roommate, you probably don’t have anything to worry about.

The mess (and maybe a slight smell) might be a nuisance, but try to check in with your roommate to see if anything has changed recently that might be causing them to neglect their housework.

If they are apologetic or willing to cooperate with your requests, you’re good to go.

When it becomes hoarding

There are a few red flags that are cause for concern — especially if you notice multiple signs or extreme conditions.

  • Overwhelming smells or visible mold, mildew or pests
  • Rooms or common areas become difficult to navigate
  • Unnecessary items rapidly accumulating in outdoor or garage areas
  • Denying access to certain rooms or areas
  • Vehicle full of personal belongings and other items
  • Unwilling to cooperate with cleanup requests or giving constant justifications for the mess

Noticing any one of these signs doesn’t necessarily mean your roommate is struggling with hoarding, but they are usually good indications that the problem is heading in that direction.

Knowing some of the warning signs can help you come up with an action plan before the situation gets out of control.

hoarding

How to handle hoarding

If you do suspect your roommate is struggling with hoarding tendencies, it’s important not to make quick judgments.

Someone unorganized, messy or has trouble letting go of extra personal belongings may get overwhelmed or stressed about something going on in their lives, but individuals struggling with hoarding might be dealing with a bigger mental health issue, finding it difficult to make changes or set limits without help.

A little empathy and patience can go a long way in getting cooperation from a messy roommate.

Try to find out the root cause of the problem and see if you can offer your roommate any support. Let them know that the clutter is beginning to affect you. See if you can agree on a cleaning schedule and set other expectations that you can both agree to.

Find a starting point that focuses on immediate items related to your health and safety including issues like addressing any mold or mildew. Focus on common areas since that is a shared space between the two of you. Suggest beginning with less daunting tasks like removing and emptying all garbage or organizing entryways and walkways.

If your roommate is seriously struggling with hoarding, don’t be afraid to ask for outside help. Your landlord is a good place to start. They may have suggestions or even be able to point out cleanliness clauses written into your lease agreement.

The post Clutter vs. Hoarding: When to Worry About Your Roommate appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

How to Create a Roommate Cleaning Schedule

Is there anything worse than coming home from a long day at work and seeing the kitchen turned upside down for the third day in a row? Before you throw in the towel, bring up a roommate cleaning schedule in your next house meeting. Assigning specific tasks and building a roommate chore chart can help everyone take more responsibility for their messes.

Showing how you can work together vs. just sending passive-aggressive vibes can help you get along better and keep the apartment clean. It’s all about communication when it comes to roommate compatibility.

Follow these tips to build a roommate chore chart and keep your home clean.

Sync on cleaning habits

Whether you found your roommate through Facebook, a friend or an app, you only got a few minutes to get to know each other before you decided that they were a good fit. You must check compatibility during the interview.

Here are a few questions that can help determine if you have the same cleaning habits, for example.

  1. How often did you do the dishes in your old home?
  2. How did you and your roommate split the deep cleaning of the apartment?
  3. Did you have any altercations about cleaning tasks not being done? How did you resolve them?
  4. If the trash is full, do you walk away or take it out and add a new bag?
  5. How often do you think we should do a deep clean of the apartment?

You’ll see red flags as they talk about their old roommates (this is why references are essential!) and determine if your cleaning personalities sync up.

How to make a cleaning schedule

What exactly does the word “clean” mean to you and your roommate? Determine how often the roommate should do the tasks — daily, weekly, monthly — and how detailed they should go with their task. For example, should someone clean the grout in the shower or wipe all surfaces in the bathroom? Does mopping come into the equation or just sweeping? It’s essential to agree on what “clean” looks like for all roommates.

Assign zones to each person (kitchen, bathroom and living room) and what can be done together (outdoor space). This is a good time to make rules about personal items in shared spaces — don’t leave your laptop or dirty socks in the living room, for example. Your personal things should remain in your bedroom.

Once you’ve made a list of the tasks to complete, it’s time to create the roommate chore chart.

rooommates cleaning

Making a roommate chore chart

While there’s no allowance attached to this roommate chore chart like the good old days of childhood, the reward is a clean home and a good relationship with your roommate. We call that a win-win. Here’s how to get started.

Make the chore list together

Pick a Saturday morning, make breakfast together and spend a few hours walking around the apartment. Make a list per room of the cleaning tasks you would like to see done.

For example, in the kitchen, write down taking out the trash, loading the dishwasher, buying cleaning supplies, wiping down the counters and sweeping the floor as items for your chore list. Then do the same for each shared space.

You can keep the bedrooms out of the chore list as they are personal spaces. List everything per room and evenly split tasks between the roommates based on interests and usage. These chore tasks typically are fast and easy to complete on a daily, weekly and monthly basis.

When are the tasks getting done?

Some tasks will happen every day like taking out the trash or doing the dishes and other tasks work well on a weekly basis. Next to each chore task, list how often the task is done. A few examples of timelines:

  • Daily: Empty out the garbage every morning, pick up clutter from shared spaces and load the dishwasher. Pick up as you go is a great way to stay on top of dirty counter spaces, clutter and dishes. Use a dish, put it in the dishwasher immediately after rinsing.
  • Weekly: Take the garbage to the curb, wipe all counters including kitchen and bathroom, sweep and vacuum the floors, clean the toilet and shower and make any lists for the grocery store. Rooms like the living room and bathrooms should be cleaned on a weekly basis to avoid any pile-up of dirt, food or clutter.
  • Monthly: Wash all kitchen towels and couch blankets, replenish any household items that are old and clean out the fridge. The kitchen should be deep cleaned on a monthly basis and it’s best for a team project.

Shell out the assignments

Split chore assignments evenly, so everyone is doing the same or similar amount of work and add their name next to the assignment with a deadline, if applicable. Designate specific tasks to the same person over time, like emptying the garbage daily, to avoid confusion. The roommate should complete this task at the end of each day.

Other tasks like loading the dishwasher need to be completed by the person who didn’t cook dinner or, if you don’t cook dinner together, by the person who made the mess. This way, some of the tasks rotate, especially those that are generally not wanted. Roommates assigned weekly completion tasks can pick a specific weekday, so they don’t all pile up on the weekends.

Before finalizing the assignments, make sure everyone agrees and airs out their grievances to ensure all compromises were met.

Print out the roommate chore chart

Here’s a quick template to use for your roommate chore chart — download the chore chart so you can print it, laminate it and stick it on the fridge for everyone to see your roommate cleaning schedule.

roommate chore chart to create a roommate cleaning schedule

Check-in as time goes on

Once you’ve settled with the roommate cleaning schedule for a few weeks, review it again during your next roommate meeting. If it’s better for you to do the dishes at night and maybe your roommate can take the trash out in the morning, make sure to communicate that. You have a higher probability of sticking with it if it fits your schedule a little more.

Keep the (cleaning) harmony at home

Finding the perfect roommate is genuinely a feat. It’s so hard to get to know a perfect stranger over a short meet-up. But if you communicate your expectations initially, like what cleaning mistakes set you off, you’ll find a better fit for your home.

Refer back to this roommate chore chart when discussing your cleaning schedule and check in with each other as time passes for any needed changes.

The post How to Create a Roommate Cleaning Schedule appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

5 Ways to Clean Your Stove Grates

Gas stoves are often preferred by culinary enthusiasts, but those grates can get nasty quickly. Over the years, really smart people have figured out easy hacks for cleaning stove grates and stovetops.

Here, we break down some steps and basic materials on how to clean a stovetop to perfection. Just so you can mess it up all over again.

Clean stove grates the easy way

First and foremost, always wait until grates are totally cooled before removing them from the cooktop. There’s no sense in ending up in the ER with major burns.

Clean kitchen.

1. Cleaning stove grates with dish soap

This is probably the easiest and most basic method for cleaning stove grates.

Materials: dish soap, water and a soft cloth.

  1. Fill up the sink with hot, soapy water.
  2. Soak the grates for at least 20 minutes (do not do this for un-coated cast iron grates, see another method).
  3. For really gross grates, make a paste using one part water, three parts baking soda. Allow it to sit for 20 minutes.
  4. Using a soft cloth, wipe down the burners (rinse first if you used baking soda paste)
  5. Dry thoroughly, then replace on the cooktop.

Although this method does require some elbow grease, it’s still a fairly low-key way to clean stove grates until they reach sparkling status.

2. Cleaning stove grates with ammonia

If you’re not a fan of strong chemicals like ammonia, keep on reading. If you hate scrubbing, however, this could be just the grate cleaning method for you!

Before you begin, here are some safety items to note. Never let ammonia get in your eyes. Wear gloves to protect your skin. Never ever mix it with bleach or anything that contains bleach. Doing so turns toxic quick!

Materials: ammonia, Ziploc bags large enough to fit your grates, rubber gloves. If you have large grates substitute kitchen trash bags in place of Ziplocs.

  1. Place one dirty grate per bag.
  2. Add one-quarter to one-half of a cup of ammonia to the bag.
  3. Seal the Ziploc bag. Tie the kitchen bag closed. Make sure there’s some air left in the bag because it’s the air that circulates the ammonia and helps it work its magic.
  4. Keep the grates in the bags overnight.
  5. In the morning, open some windows or otherwise make sure you have plenty of ventilation.
  6. Open bags and dump liquid contents into the sink.
  7. Rinse grates under warm, running water.

Now, marvel over how clean they are!

Again, take care to avoid any chemical exposure when cleaning the stove grates this way. Safety first!

Vinegar, water and a sponge.

3. Cleaning stove grates with vinegar

It’s much easier to avoid a huge mess if it’s handled a little bit every day. To prevent unsightly pileups use a daily vinegar spray to keep stove grates clean. It’s cheap and non-toxic.

Materials: spray bottle, white vinegar, gloves and a clean cloth

  1. Put on the gloves.
  2. Fill the spray bottle with white vinegar.
  3. Spray the grates.
  4. After about 15 minutes, wipe the grates with the cloth. Repeat if necessary.

Doesn’t get much easier than that!

4. Cleaning stove grates with baking soda

Much like white vinegar, baking soda is widely beloved for its cleaning capabilities. Try using a simple baking soda paste to get those grates back to good.

Materials: 3 Tbsp baking soda, 3 Tbsp cold water, gloves, paper towels or a clean cloth and a soft-bristled scrub brush

  1. Mix water and baking soda in a bowl to form a paste.
  2. Apply the baking soda paste to the grates.
  3. Let sit for about 20 minutes, then scrub with the brush.
  4. Using the cloth or towels, wipe the grates clean.

The bonus thing about baking soda is that it is a really great scrubber but won’t damage any surfaces.

Degreaser spray for cleaning stove grates

5. Cleaning stove grates with degreaser

It’s not necessary to use homemade cleaners on stove grates. Plenty of commercial products are available that do a bang-up job, as well.

Materials: a non-toxic degreaser

  1. Place the stove grates in the sink.
  2. Spray liberally with a non-toxic degreaser.
  3. Let soak for about 15 or 20 minutes.
  4. Rinse the grates with hot water.
  5. Scrub with a nylon brush and tackle any stubborn stains as needed.

Remember to let the grates dry completely before putting them back on the stove.

how to clean stovetop

How to clean the rest of the stovetop

Clearly, a stove is more than just grates. When they get dirty, the rest of the parts tend to, as well. Here are a few steps to getting a fully clean gas stovetop:

  1. Make sure the stove is totally cooled off. Remove the stove grates and set them aside.
  2. Wipe up crumbs or other food particles from the stovetop.
  3. Pull off burner caps and set them aside.
  4. Spray with your cleaning agent of choice. Use a soap/water combo, liquid degreaser or vinegar/water mixture. Let soak in for a few minutes.
  5. Use a soft scouring pad to scrub. Throughout the process, use a clean paper towel to lift out the grime and remove it. Repeat as needed.
  6. If anything refuses to come off, use a nylon scrub brush or toothbrush for a little more oomph.
  7. Wipe off the stove surface with clean paper towels until dry. Then, use glass cleaner to do another once over to bring back the shine and remove degreaser leftovers.
  8. Clean burner caps in warm, soapy water. Once the cooktop is clean, put burner caps and grates back on.

An electric stove top usually needs only some warm, soapy water and a sponge. Use a baking soda paste or commercial cleaner, if necessary, to get rid of stubborn stains.

The cleaner the stove grates, the cleaner the kitchen

Obviously, this process doesn’t need to happen after every single cooking session. But it is a good idea to keep an eye out for stovetop grate buildup to make it a less laborious process.

Spend less time cleaning stove grates and more time eating and enjoying the fruits of your labors!

The post 5 Ways to Clean Your Stove Grates appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

6 Easy Ways to Get Rid of Rust

Everyone dreads rust — that brown, crusty substance that forms on metal, fabric and tile. Fear not, we’ve got you covered. Once you learn how to get rid of rust and remove rust stains from metal and other materials, it’s a game-changer for your cleaning routine.

How to remove rust from metal

Rust forms when metal is exposed to moisture and starts to corrode. Rust mainly grows on metals and you’ll see it on anything from your favorite kitchen knives to kids’ metal playgrounds. Luckily, there are many household pantry items that remove rust on metals.

1. Baking soda

Baking soda in the sink.

Baking soda is one of the most common ways to get rid of rust. It’s great because you likely have it in your house already and it works great on thinner metals and metals that have lightly started to rust. Here are the steps for using baking soda to get rid of rust:

  1. Make a paste of water and baking soda.
  2. Coat the entire metal with the paste and make sure the rusted part is especially coated with the mixture.
  3. Wait about 30 minutes.
  4. Take a rough sponge and scrub the rust.
  5. Rinse well.

Once you have gone through all the steps, make sure to dry the object well to prevent it from rusting again. Remember, rust starts in the first place when exposed metal experiences moisture and isn’t thoroughly dried.

2. Vinegar

White vinegar is the go-to for so many cleaning hacks and rust is no exception. Use this vinegar hack step to get rid of rust.

  1. Submerge the rusted object in a bowl of white vinegar and let it soak overnight.
  2. Take the item out and scrub the rust away. This might take a little extra effort to get the stubborn rust off.
  3. If all the rust wasn’t removed, repeat the process but let it soak longer this time.
  4. Once all the rust is gone, wash the items with soap and water and dry them thoroughly.

Vinegar works on almost all rust from your tools to rusty pipes. Keep this in mind next time you come across a stubborn rust stain.

3. Potato and dish soap

Potatoes are magical vegetables with endless possibilities. Not only do they make any meal delicious, but they also contain oxalic acid which gets rid of rust. Who knew? Here’s how you can use potatoes to get rid of rust.

  1. Cut the potato in half.
  2. Apply salt or baking soda to the potato.
  3. Cover the rusted object with dish soap.
  4. Use the potato to scrub the rust away.
  5. Rinse and dry well.

If you’re looking for a great, inexpensive, natural and non-toxic hack to remove rust, a potato is one of your best options.

4. Lemon and salt

lemon and salt to remove rust from metal

Along with potatoes, lemons are another non-toxic way to get rid of rust. Get yourself a lemon or lime and you’re one step closer to a rust-free home.

  1. Cover the rusted item with coarse salt.
  2. Take a lemon and scrub the salt to remove the rust.
  3. Once the rust is gone quickly wash it off to prevent any damage.

Not only is this a great technique to remove rust but it leaves your items smelling citrusy and delicious.

5. Citric acid

Citric acid is another easy way to remove stubborn rust from metal objects. You can find this in most grocery stores on the baking aisle. Here’s how to use citric acid to remove rust.

  1. Add three tablespoons of citric acid to hot water.
  2. Let the rusted object soak overnight.
  3. Rinse and dry.

Keep in mind while citric acid is great for removing rust it also removes paint and other forms of coating. So, be careful what objects you use on it because you may remove more than just rust.

6. Rust-removing products

There are many products on the market that remove rust, such as Evapo-rust. Here is how you can use products like this to remove rust.

  1. Soak the rusted object in the product for 30 minutes.
  2. Scrub rust.
  3. Rinse thoroughly.

These products are typically easy to find and easy to use. They work on most metals and are proven very effective.

Removing rust stains on other materials

While rust primarily grows on metals, it’s important to know it can stain other things such as fabric and tiles. Here are a couple of tips for removing stains from those types of items.

Ceramic tile

Removing rust from tile is very simple and easy to accomplish.

  1. Cover with soap and hot water.
  2. Use a pumice stone to scrub the stain.
  3. Dry.

Note: Don’t use a pumice stone on a ceramic countertop as it could cause scratching.

Blue rusty pot.

Carpet

If you happen to get a rust stain on your carpet there are a couple of ways to go about removing it.

  1. Use a carpet-safe stain remover.
  2. Use lemon, salt and hot water to scrub away the stain.

The type of carpet you have and your preference for the method will determine how you go about taking care of the stain. Both methods above have proven effective to remove said stain.

Prevention is the best method to get rid of rust

If you’re not one to enjoy cleaning rust in the first place then learning how to prevent it is the next best thing. Here is how you can prevent rust from growing at all.

  • Use stainless steel instead of other metals.
  • Apply oil to metals to slow down the rusting process and sometimes even prevent it altogether.
  • Store metals in low moisture and humidity-controlled environments.

Consider these methods before the rusting process begins to save yourself some trouble in the long run. If you do spot rust, though, these tips and tricks will make removing rust from metal a little easier.

The post 6 Easy Ways to Get Rid of Rust appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

How To Clean Stainless Steel: 10 Affordable Methods For A Sleek Finish

Stainless steel is best known for its ability to resist rust and other corrosion, making it a prime choice for kitchens and bathrooms. However, it’s hardly ever free from fingerprints and other marks, so you can’t forget to clean it routinely. The good news is, there are plenty of easy and cheap ways to make your stainless steel look brand new again.

Stainless steel material

Before we dive in on ways to clean your stainless steel you must first understand the material. Just like wood and certain fabrics, stainless steel has a grain to it. These are faint striations you can see on its surface. As you wipe the material, make sure you go in the direction of the grain for optimal cleansing and shine.

Now that we’ve got that covered, check out these top 10 tips on how to clean stainless steel to gain back its sleek and flawless finish.

1. Dish soap and baby oil

The dish soap and baby oil duo is almost unbeatable when it comes to cleaning and polishing. The dish soap will clear the stainless steel of any oils, fingerprints and dust on your surface while the oil polishes and makes it shine. Simply moisten a cotton rag and put a little bit of dish soap on it and wipe along the grain of your stainless steel. Once you’re rid of any marks, dry the surface with a clean towel.

Next, dab a small amount (a couple of drops) of baby oil onto another rag. Wipe along the grain as you did in the cleansing process with the dish soap. This gives your stainless steel a properly polished finish as if it was brand new!

Best for: Stainless steel appliances, countertops, sink, pots and pans

2. Windex and microfiber cloth

personal cleaning stainless steel oven

People often complain about fingerprints left on stainless steel. However, using a glass cleaner like Windex will do the trick! Spray the cleaner on a dry cloth (preferably microfiber) and evenly apply in circular motions. It’s not recommended to spray directly onto your appliance, as this could result in more drip marks and residue. Repeat the process until there are no more fingerprints and then rinse thoroughly and dry with a towel.

Best for: Stainless steel appliances and countertops

3. White vinegar and olive oil

White vinegar and olive oil are also great for cleaning any grime while polishing your stainless steel appliances. Apply white vinegar to a microfiber cloth or spray it directly onto your surface and let it sit for a moment before wiping it away (with the grain). Repeat this process until there is no more grime left to remove. Finally, dab a clean towel in some olive oil and polish in the direction of the grain. If any olive oil remains, wipe away with a fresh cloth.

Best for: Stainless steel appliances and countertops

Does vinegar damage stainless steel?

If left on for too long, vinegar can cause damage to your stainless steel. It’s important to not let any stainless steel material soak in a vinegar solution, but it’s harmless if you make sure to wipe it away in a timely manner.

4. Club soda

Girl cleaning stainless steel oven

Club soda surprisingly is a great cleaner as it cleanses away any fingerprints and food residue while simultaneously leaving a nice shine. Spray club soda directly onto your stainless steel surface and then wipe in the direction of the grain. Repeat as necessary.

Best for: Stainless steel appliances, countertops, sinks, pots, pans and jewelry

5. Warm water

Plain water seems so simple, but you’d be surprised how much cleaning some warm water and elbow grease can accomplish. It’s also the least risky option for cleaning stainless steel. Simply dampen a microfiber or special polishing cloth with some warm water and wipe your surface in the direction of the polish lines. Once you’ve ridden any unwanted smudges and residue, dry the material with a clean towel or cloth to prevent water spots.

Best for: Stainless steel appliances, countertops, sinks, pots and pans

6. WD-40

Have a leftover can of WD-40 from your squeaky door? Well lucky for you, WD-40 also cleans and protects surfaces including stainless steel. Spray some directly onto your appliance or into a clean rag and then wipe in the direction of the grain. For an added bonus, WD-40 provides a layer of protection to help prevent future smudges and pesky fingerprints. Keep in mind that this is a petroleum-based product, so it should be used with care around surfaces where you’ll be handling food. So make sure you clean thoroughly before proceeding as normal.

Best for: Stainless steel appliances

7. Lemon oil furniture polish

Someone using lemon oil furniture polish to clean stainless steel

If you have some furniture polish laying around, that’ll also do the trick for cleaning your stainless steel. Apply the polish to a clean cloth and rub it evenly on your appliance. Don’t apply the polish directly onto your stainless steel surface, as it may leave you with too much uneven excess. Once it’s evenly applied, wipe it clean with a fresh cloth in the direction of the grain.

Best for: Stainless steel appliances

8. Flour

Not only is flour great for baking delicious cakes, but also for buffing and polishing your stainless steel. Flour isn’t great for cleansing away grime or grease, but is a great final touch that will make your surfaces shine! Simply sprinkle flour onto your dry stainless steel surface until it’s fully covered. Then use a soft cloth to buff in circular motions until your surface starts to shine like it’s brand new!

Best for: Stainless steel countertops, sinks, pot and pans

9. Baking soda

someone using baking soda to clean stainless steel pan

Baking soda is a magic worker when it comes to cleaning. You can use it for just about anything and it’s extremely easy and cheap to come by. Make a paste with baking soda and water and let it sit on a problem area for a few minutes. Wipe away using a rag dampened with white vinegar followed by a cloth dampened with water. Dry using a microfiber cloth. This process is best for more stubborn stains and heavy-duty messes.

Best for: Stainless steel countertops, sinks, pots and pans

10. Store-bought stainless steel cleaner

Of course, there are cleaners that are specifically designed to clean and polish stainless steel, but they are rather expensive. If your appliance or surface has major staining, scratching or just needs a thorough polishing, this is an excellent option that may just be worth the extra penny. Make sure you read the directions on the cleaner and do a test on a small spot on your stainless steel before fully diving in.

Best for: Stainless steel appliances and countertops

What should you not use on stainless steel?

Now that you know what can be used on stainless steel, it’s important to cover the major “don’ts” when it comes to proper cleaning of the material.

Do not use:

  • Chlorine-based products
  • Oven cleaners
  • Steel wool or harsh scratchers or sponges
  • Harsh tap water that could leave water spots and stains (best to use distilled or filtered water)

What is the best cleaner for stainless steel?

If you are looking for the absolute best solution to your stainless steel cleaning routine, a store-bought cleaner may be your best option. However, DIY cleaners come in a close second and are much cheaper and convenient so give those a try before opting for a commercial cleaner.

The post How To Clean Stainless Steel: 10 Affordable Methods For A Sleek Finish appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

What to Do About Bad Smells in the House

When you’ve found the perfect new home and are counting down the days until you can move in, nothing can put a damper on your spirits quite like bad smells in the house that just doesn’t seem to go away. Musty or stale smells, odors from previous smokers or pet owners, or even smells from fresh paint can be less-than-welcome and hard to get rid of.

While it might take a little elbow grease, there are several plans you can put into place to get your new home smelling a little fresher.

1. Start with a top-to-bottom deep clean

cleaning

While one can hope that the previous owners, previous tenants or landlord have already done a thorough move-out clean, it doesn’t hurt to go through the process once more to ensure nothing was left behind in the turnover process.

Wipe down surfaces, sweep and mop the floors and use your go-to cleaning products, so the scents left behind will be familiar to you. Perhaps the most important task: open up the windows, turn on any ceiling fans and let fresh air circulate throughout your new home. This will help eliminate any bad smell in the house.

2. Try to identify the cause of the odor

dirty dog

If the bad smell in your home still seems to be lingering a day or two after you’ve cleaned and aired out your new space, it’s time to get to the bottom of the issue. Depending on the source, your cleaning techniques will be different.

Pet odors

Odors left behind by pets can be notoriously strong and difficult to get rid of — especially if your home has carpet. Try to identify specific areas where pet urine may have left stains — a blacklight can help you here as it will illuminate any areas containing urine.

You can try techniques like baking soda or an enzyme-based carpet cleaner to spot treat the area and neutralize lingering odors. Spot test any cleaning products first or your security deposit could be at risk if you cause further damage to the flooring.

Food odors

If strong food or spice smells are still present after your general cleaning, focus your attention on the kitchen and deep clean areas like vents, fans, oven, refrigerator, etc. Examine sinks and garbage disposals to see if they might be the source of bad smells. Consider asking your landlord to repaint any walls located close to the oven, refrigerator, sink or microwave.

Smoke odors

Cigarette smoke is one of the most potent odors and hardest to remove, which is why most landlords and property managers prohibit smoking of any kind indoors. Very strong remaining odors can even lead to thirdhand smoke damage to new occupants.

To truly tackle cigarette smoke odors, removable items like blinds, carpet and draperies will need replacing, which is something you should discuss with your landlord.

Mold odors

Odors from mold or moisture damage are not only unpleasant, but they can also impact your health. Mold typically grows in parts of the home that are prone to moisture or ventilation issues — like the bathroom or basement — but can grow almost anywhere including on wood, carpet, food and fabric.

For areas with light mold like the shower, use bleach to effectively remove the mold. For larger mold issues, contact your property manager as a few states have laws in place defining landlord responsibility regarding mold maintenance.

3. Consult with your property owner

man on the phone talking about bad smells in the home

If you’ve done your own deep cleaning, tried to address the issue at the source and still can’t seem to shake the bad smell in your home, it’s time to consult with your landlord to see how the two of you can address the situation together. In some cases, foul odors can be a sign of a larger issue that is beyond renter control.

Stubborn odors from a previous pet or smoke damage may require a cleaning crew or maintenance crew to replace items like blinds and filters. If your home contains a substantial amount of carpet, ask to have the carpets professionally cleaned if they weren’t already before you moved in.

You may run into issues concerning financial responsibility, as foul odors from food or unhygienic previous tenants are not typically a health risk (though odors from cigarette smoke or pets may be, depending on individual situations). Your landlord may ask you to split the costs or cover costs of additional cleaning if you are unhappy with the living situation, but it is always worth bringing it to their attention early on to see what the two of you can work out.

Eliminate bad smells in your house

Even though they are a pain to deal with, most unpleasant smells in the home can be handled if you are persistent and try various tried-and-true methods to eliminate them.

The post What to Do About Bad Smells in the House appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

10 Natural Ant Repellents to Keep Bugs Out

The ants go marching one by one hurrah, hurrah!

This is cute, animated children’s song but when you see ants marching through your own apartment, it’s suddenly not so much fun. If you notice that these pesky blank insects are a common occurrence in your apartment and are wondering how to get rid of ants, we’ve got some home remedies for ants ready for you to try.

Natural ant repellents to try at home

If you’re looking for a way to get rid of ants without using a pesticide or professional pest control services, here are 10 natural ant repellents and home remedies for ants that you can try.

You can make these natural ant repellents with things you have in your own home, so it’ll be an easy way for you to rid yourself of these pesky critters.

1. Mint

mint

Peppermint essential oil is a simple home remedy for ants that you can make yourself.

Get some peppermint essential oil or peppermint leaves, mix it with water and spray around baseboards, doors and windows to deter ants. However, if you have pets, keep in mind that this ant solution is toxic to animals.

2. White vinegar

white vinegar

White vinegar is truly an all-purpose household product. From cleaning and disinfecting to getting rid of ants, white vinegar is a must-have product.

Take a mixture of hot water and vinegar and scrub your floor and countertops with it as a way to get rid of ants. While the smell is strong for an hour or so, it’ll rid your home of ants.

3. Cinnamon

cinnamon

Cinnamon smells and tastes good, but did you know it can also be used as a natural ant repellent? You can use either cinnamon essential oil or cinnamon powder to repel ants.

Take a cotton ball or Q-tip and dab it with cinnamon oil and then place it where you’ve seen ants. Or, sprinkle cinnamon powder along windowsills, baseboards or door entries to stop ants from entering.

4. Pepper

pepper

Pepper is another kitchen staple that everyone has and uses to season food. However, it can also be used as a home remedy for ants.

Sprinkle pepper wherever you have an ant problem. The smell will irritate them and they’ll go away. You can use cayenne or black pepper as your natural ant repellent.

5. Chalk line

chalk line

This natural ant repellent is somewhat mysterious. Ants use scent as a way to navigate. By drawing a line of chalk where you noticed ants, it seems to disturb the trail of smell and confuse ants. They won’t cross the line anymore and will go away.

6. Water line

water

Like the chalk line trick, you can also get your finger wet and draw a water line where you noticed ants last. This will also deter ants, disrupt the smell and help get rid of your ant problem.

7. Hand soap

hand soap

Take a pump of hand or dish soap and mix it with some hot water and put it into a spray bottle. You can use this concoction to spray down countertops, entryways or other areas you’ve noticed ants marching about.

Use this natural ant repellent as a way to rid your home of the ant problem while cleaning at the same time.

8. Tea tree oil

tea tree oil

Tea tree oil is another home remedy for ants. Like the other essential oil remedies, you can use tea tree oil mixed with water as a spray to repel ants or you can saturate cotton balls in tea tree oil and place those cotton balls around the house in high-trafficked ant areas.

Both remedies will work, but be careful to keep this away from pets if you’re a pet owner.

9. Coffee grounds

coffee grounds

Who doesn’t have a morning cup of Joe? Well, instead of throwing away your coffee grounds, you can use them to repel ants.

Simply sprinkle the coffee grounds around countertops, windowsills, doors, the pantry or any other area you’ve seen ants crawling around. This hack will rid you of ants and you’ll get more use out of your coffee each day.

10. Corn starch

cornstarch

This last approach on how to get rid of ants is a bit messier, but it’s effective.

Do you notice a large cluster of ants or a hive instead of just one or two? If you see a hive of ants, cover it with corn starch and then dump water on it. This will kill the hive entirely.

Preventing ant infestations upfront

These 10 natural ant repellent suggestions are great if you already have an ant problem. However, there are ways to prevent ants from entering your house upfront.

  1. Check your pantry: Ants love food and crumbs and they will feast in your pantry or cupboards. Make sure you seal all of your dry food in plastic containers so ants can’t get into the boxes of food stored in your pantry. Also, make sure to sweep or vacuum your pantry regularly and get all of those tasty crumbs off the floor.
  2. Clean often: Make sure you’re sweeping and mopping your floor daily, if not weekly. This will ensure that there are no crumbs on the floor that ants can snack on.
  3. Pest control: If you want to control ants or any type of insect or pest problem, you can consider hiring a pest control expert to spray your home.

Keeping bugs out

No matter where you live, you’ll likely see a bug or two in your apartment at some point. However, there are easy ways to rid your home of ants using home remedies and ingredients you already have on hand.

The post 10 Natural Ant Repellents to Keep Bugs Out appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com