Tag Archive: College

The 20 Best Neighborhoods in Salt Lake City in 2021

What started as a pioneer settlement has now grown into one of the most desirable cities in the western United States. Salt Lake City is one of, if not the best places to live in Utah. Due to recent events and changes in the remote work environment, crowds are flocking to the valley to take up permanent residence and it’s also quickly becoming a hub for tech companies.

While there truly isn’t a terrible place to live in the city, some areas are better than others when it comes to shopping, dining, architecture, views and a few other factors. Here are the best neighborhoods in Salt Lake City to give you an idea of what most residents enjoy about where they live.

Salt Lake City.

The Avenues

Potentially the most desirable neighborhood in Salt Lake, The Avenues have a little bit of everything. It’s nestled in the northeastern corner of the valley, offering great views of the city. Plus, its charming historic homes and family-owned restaurants create a quiet, quaint atmosphere.

Since it’s just at the foot of the mountains, there are plenty of hiking trails literally at your doorstep. There are many parks and walkable areas, perfect for anyone wanting an active lifestyle or who has pets that like spending time outdoors.

Sugarhouse

Full of unique restaurants, bars and coffee shops, Sugarhouse is a lively neighborhood where you’ll never be bored. With the University of Utah and Westminster close by, many students live in the area. However, there’s also a mix of established families and young professionals in the area.

Sugarhouse is walk- and bike-friendly. Most major roads have bike lanes and wide sidewalks to keep them safe for bikers and pedestrians. Plus, everything you could ever need is within walking distance. Whether you’re looking for groceries, boutiques or a cool cafe to spend the afternoon in, it’s close by.

Capitol Hill in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Capitol Hill

Capitol Hill, named for its location around the state capitol building, tends to attract many young professionals. It has plenty of parks for outdoor enjoyment and bars for indoor entertainment and mingling.

The homes and apartments in this neighborhood are mostly older buildings that have gone through renovations. While the buildings maintain their original charm, so you’ll see that they have a clean, modernized touch. Capitol Hill also has some of the most incredible views of the city, overlooking the entire valley. Notably, it has views of downtown and Temple Square. This view is especially stunning during the winter holidays, the Fourth of July and the local Pioneer Day celebrations.

Downtown

Salt Lake City’s most active area is certainly Downtown. There are more restaurants, cafes, bars than anyone could probably visit in their lifetime. There’s also great shopping—anything from small boutiques to large commercial shopping centers.

Many people both live and work downtown, often walking, biking or taking the UTA TRAX whenever they need to get somewhere. In fact, the downtown area has some of the best walk, bike and overall transit scores in the valley. Its walk, bike and transit scores are 87, 93 and 69, respectively. So owning a car is purely optional for residents here.

9th and 9th

The coveted 9th and 9th neighborhood is a well-known shopping and eating hangout. Filled with boutiques and delicious restaurants, it has a very calm, leisurely feel to it. The relaxing vibe is partially created by the amazing art that is around every corner. The other great part of 9th and 9th is the fun people you can find behind every door.

Homes in this area seem a little on the small side, but they’re both funky and chic. Pulling from the old architecture of original houses built in the early 1900s, the homes mix in newer stylings to stay modern.

Salt Lake City.

Yalecrest

Yalecrest initially attracts students who are attending school across the street — at the University of Utah. But once they finish their studies, they end up staying years after the fact. Its easily walkable streets are very safe. And the neighborhood has enough local stores and restaurants that owning a car isn’t necessary for day-to-day life. Plus, it’s near the UTA TRAX and bus lines in case you do need to travel further.

If you’re a fan of Tudor-style architecture, Yalecrest is a visual treat. It’s not a typical cookie-cutter suburb — it’s full of unique homes of all designs, complete with brick and exposed wood beams.

East Bench

The East Bench neighborhood is known for its unobstructed views stretching all the way over to the Great Salt Lake. The neighborhood is over the side of the eastern mountains lining the valley. While many of its residents are older and more established, there are also many younger families taking up residency.

East Bench is further away from the busy city, but it’s still close to everything you could need. It’s also only a 10-minute drive to downtown, where there’s great entertainment and food. Residents are out of the constant city bustle but they still enjoy the city perks.

Temple Square in Salt Lake City.

Temple Square

At the heart of downtown Salt Lake, Temple Square and the surrounding streets are surprisingly calm and kept very neat and tidy. Many members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints live and work in the area (depending on what you’re after, this could be a pro or a con).

You’ll find lots of church history museums, along with other church-owned properties. Such properties include a large tabernacle, a conference center, and, of course, the Salt Lake Temple. The area is very walkable and near lots of public transportation, including the UTA TRAX and FrontRunner.

Sugar House Park

Perhaps the best park in Salt Lake, Sugar House Park is not only big, but it’s beautiful. It boasts beautiful views of the mountains, lots of trees, a pond and various sports courts.

The Sugar House Park neighborhood is also near a large shopping and dining center right off the freeway. Everything is at your fingertips and it makes owning a car unnecessary.

Westminster

As its name suggests, the Westminster neighborhood surrounds Westminster College. It’s no surprise that there are many students living in the area. However, students aren’t the only ones enjoying the neighborhood.

Being so close to a shopping and dining hub, this neighborhood draws in the crowds. Here, you can enjoy good food and fun bars, many of which have classic bar games like pool and darts. You’ve also got a few parks nearby. Liberty Park is one of the best, there’s always an event happening and you can catch live music, markets and festivals.

The Country Club

Right off the freeway at the mouth of Parley’s Canyon, The Country Club is a classy neighborhood full of larger homes. By “larger homes,” we mean in comparison to the other smaller historic homes typically found in Salt Lake.

This neighborhood encircles a large country club with a golf course. Many of its residents fall under the “well established” category of older folks who have done well for themselves. You won’t find better-kept homes or yards anywhere in the valley and even strolling through the streets is a treat in and of itself.

Salt Lake City neighborhood.

Highland Park

Highland Park is a fun, eclectic area with a combination of shopping and dining like you’ve never seen before. Instead of boutiques and chain restaurants, you’ll find the likes of stores selling plants, yard decor and secondhand books, along with classic Dutch and Greek cuisine.

It is truly a one-of-a-kind neighborhood that transports residents and visitors to different places and times. However, if that’s not your cup of tea, you’re right off the freeway and less than 15 minutes from downtown.

East Central

Sandwiched between downtown and the University of Utah, East Central is home to many young residents. Many of those living here are attending school or just starting out in their careers. Walking is a reasonable mode of transportation and you’ll find not only everything you need to live nearby but the added benefits of concerts, live theater shows and museums.

Those living in East Central are in it for both work and play, and you’ll find a good community of social beings there.

Wasatch Hollow

The mellow, tree-lined streets of Wasatch Hollow are home to a wide range of people of all ages and various backgrounds. This neighborhood has a close sense of community, where people live for a long time and watch out for each other.

There are plenty of parks for taking a walk or spending a nice afternoon. And the many coffee shops scattered throughout the streets provide a place to meet other locals, see art from up-and-coming artists and experience live music.

This Is The Place Heritage Park.

Sunnyside East

Like East Bench, Sunnyside East has amazing views across the valley to the Great Salt Lake. However, it is slightly more secluded. This neighborhood contains the Hogle Zoo and This Is The Place Heritage Park, where you can attend various events all year long, including holidays — such as Zoo Lights and a German-style Christmas market.

Because it’s further from things, you’ll likely need a car if you live here. But the proximity to multiple hiking trails and stunning views of both the mountains above and the city below are worth the trade-off.

Bonneville Hills

Adjacent to the Bonneville Golf Course, Bonneville Hills is in a prime location near just about everything. It’s only a few minutes from downtown, the University of Utah, the Hogle Zoo, This Is The Place Heritage Park, restaurants, bars, cafes, shopping — you name it and it’s within reasonable walking distance or a short drive.

Although it’s reasonably close to the University of Utah, residents of the neighborhood include families and young professionals, with only a few students in the mix.

Park in Salt Lake City, UT.

Central City

Central City is full of young professionals who bring a vibrant, artistic vibe with them. Here you’ll find loads of indie coffee shops and cafes, many of which have extraordinary menus that cater to the residents of the neighborhood.

Because Central City is near downtown, there are many opportunities to experience live performances of all kinds, whether it’s music or comedy, and there’s lots of local art displayed in coffee shops, painted onto buildings and in galleries throughout the city.

Liberty Wells

With a good mix of young, old and everything in between, you’ll meet people from all walks of life in Liberty Wells. It’s also close to just about everything and has been seeing lots of improvements throughout the neighborhood, including new apartment buildings to provide housing for even more people in the area.

And although new buildings are popping up, there are still plenty of the old ones still standing, providing a good balance between vintage and modern architecture. Like many other neighborhoods in Salt Lake, Liberty Wells doesn’t lack food, drink or good company.

University District

Tucked in the eastern corner of Salt Lake, just inside the hills is the University of Utah and the University District. While many students live in this area, there are also residents who work at the University of Utah. Those working for the University include a wide range of careers, not just teaching — there’s a hospital and various research centers connected to the university.

While you’re slightly further away from most shopping and dining, it’s just a few minutes down the road if you’re ever in the mood for it.

Red Iguana in Salt Lake City, UT.

Photo source: The Red Iguana Restaurant / Facebook

Fairpark

Fairpark is one of the more culturally diverse neighborhoods in Salt Lake City and with that comes some of the best culturally diverse restaurants in the valley. It’s home to one of the city’s most well-known restaurants, the Red Iguana, which is typically packed most evenings, but well worth the wait!

Apart from the food, Fairpark is near the heart of the city, so entertainment and nightlife are never far, and it’s near the freeway, giving access to anywhere else around Salt Lake, including ski resorts and hiking trails.

Which Salt Lake City neighborhood fits you?

These are only a few of the many neighborhoods in Salt Lake City and each of them has its own unique combination of offerings to residents. It’s important to choose a neighborhood that fits your personality and lifestyle, whether you’re buying a home for the long term or renting an apartment for a shorter period. With so many great options, you can find apartments for rent in Salt Lake City in a neighborhood that suits you!

The post The 20 Best Neighborhoods in Salt Lake City in 2021 appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

Everything You Need for Your Kitchen & Nothing More

Kitchens. They’re amazing spaces. They can be visually stunning. They must be total workhorses. They’re quite often the heart of the home. But they can also accumulate a lot of CRAP.

As I work to not only design but also fully outfit the kitchen for the Hood Canal Cottage, I’m starting completely from scratch. No hand-me-down casserole dishes, no knives I’ve carted around since college, no random herb scissors that I’ve never ever used. For once, I get to hand-select every tool and every object that comes into the space.

With that total blank slate, I find myself often thinking (ok, obsessing) about what I want this kitchen to have. As an avid cook, as we probably all are coming through Covid, I want kitchen tools that are really pretty, but also highly functional. And nothing else.

This kitchen, designed by Our Food Stories out of a refurbished old schoolhouse in the middle of the German countryside, is a total mood. Featuring deVol kitchen cupboards, tiles, shelves, light fixtures, hardware and more. This kitchen is certainly a showcase for the many of the pieces on my list of must-have kitchen tools – and of course, it does so beautifully.

This space immediately transports you to an idyllic rural retreat. I imagine walking through overgrown gardens, picking fresh roses and making multi-course Sunday lunches here.

I love how this kitchen keeps so many key kitchen tools close at hand. While I might not be doing quite as many open shelves at Hood Canal, there is a lot to be said for having key tools within arms reach.

There’s nothing that drives me crazier than a poorly outfitted kitchen. But an overcrowded kitchen can be equally crazy-making. You have to strike that balance.

For me, the key kitchen tools I turn to time and again include one good set of pots and pans, a cast iron skillet, a good set of wooden spoons and spatulas, a top notch cutting board (or several) and then all those little tools that you need when you’re in the middle of pulling together a recipe – measuring cups, knives, peelers, strainers, graters, zesters – all the speciality things that let you add the finer components of a dish.

Those speciality tools are the kinds of things that far too many kitchens lack. Or they’re the big bulky OXOX ones you get at a grocery store that feel chunky in my hand and will just clog up my limited drawer space in the new kitchen. She gonna be cute, but she’s not going to be big.

As the weeks have progressed, I’ve been slowly but surely amassing my ultimate kitchen wish-list. Each kitchen tool, appliance, or serving piece needs to have a very critical purpose and look damn good while doing it.

I thought I’d share my wishlist with you. It’s certainly not comprehensive. As I cook every evening some other thing in my San Francisco kitchen makes me think oh yes, I have to find the beautiful version of this for Hood Canal. But all the extraneous stuff I have in my SF kitchen also makes me want to pull my hair out. I’m constantly digging for my one favorite knife or pan or bowl.

I hope you find something below you’ve been searching for. If you spot a key kitchen tool that I’m still missing, please tell me in comments! I consider my ultimate quest to outfit the ideal kitchen.

I’m also regularly adding favorites for the kitchen in the Apartment 34 SHOP so be sure to check it out too!

SHOP KITCHEN ESSENTIALS

kitchen fundamentals Shop now nordic kitchen frying pan Shop now citrus press Shop now stainless steel sauce pan Shop now balmuda toaster Shop now black carbon steel knife Shop now cast iron casserole Shop now ceramic mixing bowls Shop now brewer stand set Shop now cleaning essentials Shop now Linen Tea Towel Set Shop now skagerak paper towel holder Shop now round cutting board Shop now ceramic french press Shop now mandoline Shop now modern salad spinner Shop now measuring cups Shop now farmhouse pottery board & bow set Shop now sheldon ceramics bowl Shop now lidded bowls – set of 3 Shop now evermill spice rack Shop now baking sheets Shop now glass water kettle Shop now cooking essentials Shop now kale razor and herb stripping tool Shop now pasta machine Shop now stainless steel citrus juicer Shop now Japanese vegetable peeler Shop now hand carved serving spoons Shop now hurom juicer Shop now

all images by Our Food Stories

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Source: apartment34.com

The Best Neighborhoods in Salt Lake City

One of the most family-friendly cities in the west, Salt Lake City has more to offer than many might think. While it’s not an extremely large city, it’s definitely not small — and it’s growing. A lot.

It’s slowly becoming a new hub for tech companies, creating an abundance of jobs and drawing in the crowds from out of state. Although people are coming in droves, rent prices went down last year and you can typically find a one-bedroom apartment for between $1,200 and $1,300.

With prices like that, there’s no better time than now to find the perfect neighborhood for you in Salt Lake City.

Sugarhouse

Sugarhouse in Salt Lake City.

Photo source: Apartment Guide / 21 and View

Sugarhouse offers the best of everything — a quaint suburban feel, lots of fun, independently-owned restaurants and it radiates an eclectic feeling. Not to mention that it’s near the mouth of Parley’s Canyon, making it easy to find hikes nearby or hitting the slopes in Park City.

It’s also a really safe area, which is why there are so many people always looking to move to Sugarhouse. There are many parks, notably Sugarhouse park, which has plenty of wide-open grass fields, pavilions for public use, basketball courts and a pond.

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The Avenues

The Avenues in Salt Lake City.

The Avenues is a fairly affluent area — home to lots of historic buildings and houses built in the 1920s and 1930s. Although it’s a little more expensive here, it’s for good reason.

It has the old charm, but with new, vibrant residents that have given new life to the neighborhood over the last decade or so.

The neighborhood is safe and beautiful and it’s easy to walk to restaurants and shops in the area.

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Downtown

Salt Lake City.

Downtown is right in the middle of everything — it’s truly the heart of Salt Lake City. There’s a good mix of the old and the new, with historical sites and beautiful architecture.

There’s also lots to see and do, whether you’re wanting to try a great restaurant or shop at the massive City Creek shopping center.

You can walk most places, but you’ve also got the TRAX and FrontRunner trains that not only will get you around downtown but will get you to other outlying parts of the valley quickly (and you don’t have to deal with the traffic).

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Capitol Hill

Capitol Hill in Salt Lake City.

The area surrounding the state capitol building, fittingly named Capitol Hill, is one of the most desirable neighborhoods. Not too far from downtown, you are in close proximity to endless entertainment.

As noted by the name, it’s right on top of a hill, which overlooks the entire Salt Lake valley for some of the best views you can get. Furthermore, one of the favorite local activities every year is strolling through the cherry blossom trees that line the capitol building.

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Yalecrest

Yalecrest in Salt Lake City.

Photo source: Apartment Guide / the New Broadmoore

Safe, diverse and historic are three words that perfectly describe Yalecrest. Here, you’ll find incredible homes — many larger Tudor-style homes that make you feel like you’re in another century.

You’re right by many trendy restaurants and food markets, not to mention you’ve got both Sugar House Park and Liberty Park nearby.

A simple neighborhood walk through Yalecrest is a treat — the mature landscaping and exposed wood beams on homes never grow boring.

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Wasatch Hollow

Wasatch Hollow salt lake city

Photo source: Redfin / 1838 E Kensington Ave

Wasatch Hollow feels like many other city suburbs. It’s quiet and fairly safe but has a diverse crowd of residents to set it apart from other neighborhoods.

Many young families are settling down in the area since it’s close to grocery stores and good schools. While it’s not quite Yalecrest, full of beautiful Tudor-style homes — it’s pretty close to it with fully matured tree-lined streets and well-kept homes.

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Central City

Central City in Salt Lake City.

In Central City, you’re about as close to Downtown as you can get without actually being downtown. The age of the area is easily noticed — but in a good way.

Expect a mixture of old historic homes from different times and architectural periods and lots of restaurants with decades of history, along with newer bars and coffee shops.

The area attracts lots of young professionals who work downtown and don’t mind having a little less square footage to live in. Even with the smaller living quarters, the distinct indie vibe of Central City is well worth it if you’re looking for an interesting day-to-day life.

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Rose Park

Rose Park in Salt Lake.

While it didn’t always have a great reputation, Rose Park is now an up-and-coming neighborhood. It’s a fairly peaceful and quiet area that’s seeing a revival — more and more people are flocking to it.

Couples and young families are turning Rose Park into a more youthful area. More restaurants are opening up to accommodate the crowds.

Soon, it’s expected that the area will be one of the most lively in the valley.

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East Bench

East Bench in Salt Lake City.

Settled into the hills of the mountains to the east of the Salt Lake valley, you’ll find East Bench. This neighborhood is full of single-family homes and well-established, older residents.

Most of the homes are large and spacious here — unlike many other neighborhoods in the lower valley with smaller and tightly packed streets.

There are no grocery stores or shopping centers in the actual East Bench neighborhood, but there’s plenty nearby, — so you’re not missing out on anything important.

Despite being further from local amenities, the view from the neighborhood is an exceptional one.

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Poplar Grove

Poplar Grove in Salt Lake City.

Photo source: Apartment Guide / Cornell Street Apartments

One of the larger neighborhoods within Salt Lake City, Poplar Grove lies just east of downtown. And like some of the other neighborhoods, it’s been given new life in recent years.

It’s maintained a diverse demographic throughout the years, which is part of what makes the neighborhood great. Being so close to downtown means there’s no shortage of things to do, restaurants to eat at and shopping spots to explore!

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People’s Freeway

People

In People’s Freeway, you’ll find it’s full of laid-back restaurants and activities. Smith’s Ballpark is in the neighborhood, where you can catch Salt Lake’s minor league baseball team, the Bees.

Most residents in this area live in apartments or condos, which have drawn in more young professionals and young couples, rather than full families. And the neighborhood caters to those young professionals and couples — with plenty of chill bars and affordable restaurants around, it’s easy to meet new people in the same stage of life.

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Fairpark

Fairpark in Salt Lake City.

Fairpark, given its name for the fairgrounds in this neighborhood, is a truly eclectic area of Salt Lake.

Full of great ethnic cuisine, Fairpark offers up some of the best Mexican and Asian restaurants in the city. Furthermore, if you’re one who likes to cook cultural foods at home — there is a surplus of ethnic markets so you can buy anything you need for authentic dishes.

Fairpark is close to downtown, but a bit quieter. You still feel like you’re in the city but in a lesser-known part. You’re far from the hustle and bustle of the big city and can explore this hidden gem of a neighborhood in peace.

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Liberty Wells

Liberty Wells in Salt Lake City.

Full of restaurants, coffee shops and bars — the Liberty Wells neighborhood attracts some of the most interesting, eccentric people in the valley. Most are young professionals, so it’s no wonder the area maintains a vibrant atmosphere.

There’s not too much traffic and you can walk most places in Liberty Wells. Local businesses offer everything from handmade postcards to imported cheese — you’re always bound to find something interesting and unexpected around every corner.

If you’re wanting to meet new people, this is one of the friendliest neighborhoods where you can grab a drink and chat with almost anyone.

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Bonneville Hills

Bonneville Hills in Salt Lake City.

Bonneville Hills is your typical suburb — quiet, safe and beautiful in its own right.

With great K-12 schools in the area and the University of Utah close by, lots of families, college students and young professionals enjoy living in the neighborhood.

There are parks around every corner and you’re minutes away from many hikes and canyons, so there’s no shortage of outdoor activities right outside your front door.

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Glendale

Glendale in Salt Lake City.

Established during World War II, Glendale is one of the friendliest neighborhoods you’ll find. Its close sense of community attracts families and couples looking to settle down for a while.

With such an engaging community, Glendale brings in plenty of diversity, blending together Hispanic, Polynesian and Native American cultures — along with many others.

Plus, it’s one of the more affordable areas close to downtown, which certainly doesn’t hurt.

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Which Salt Lake City neighborhood is best for you?

There are so many wonderful neighborhoods in Salt Lake City, it’s hard to choose where to live. No matter which neighborhood draws you in, you’re sure to find that Salt Lake is a wonderful, diverse city that you’ll fit into quickly.

So check out Salt Lake City apartments to rent or homes to buy to get started with your move!

The post The Best Neighborhoods in Salt Lake City appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

6 Ways I Saved Money On College Costs

Check out this list of ways to save money on college costs. This is a great list!How much does college cost? This is a question many wonder. There’s rarely a week that goes by where I don’t receive an email from a student or parents of a student who are looking for ways to cut college costs. That’s why today I want to talk about college costs and how you can create a college budget that works so that you can save money in college.

College is very expensive – there is no doubt about that.

However, I want you to know that it IS possible to get a valuable college degree on a budget!

The average public university is over $20,000 per year and the average private university totals over $45,000 once you account for tuition, room and board, fees, textbooks, living expenses and more.

Even with how expensive college can possibly be, there are many ways to cut college expenses and create a college budget so that you can control rising college costs.

Continue reading below to read about the many different ways I cut college costs. While I was not perfect and still racked up student loan debt, I did earn three college degrees on a reasonable budget.

Related articles:

  • How I Graduated From College In 2.5 Years With 2 Degrees AND Saved $37,500
  • How I Paid Off $38,000 In Student Loan Debt In 7 Months
  • The Benefits of Paying Off Student Loan Debt Early
  • Should I Ruin My Retirement By Helping My Child Through College?
  • How To Save Money – My Best Money Saving Tips

 

1. Take classes at a community college to cut college costs.

Whether you are in college already or you haven’t started yet, taking classes at a community college can be a great way to save money.

Earning credits at a community college usually costs just a small fraction of what it would cost at a 4-year college, so you may find yourself being able to save thousands of dollars each semester.

There is a myth out there that your degree is worth less if you go to a community college. That is NOT TRUE at all. When you finally earn your 4-year degree, your degree will only say where you graduated from and it won’t even mention the community college credits at all. So this myth makes no sense because your degree looks the exact same as everyone else’s’ who you went to college with. You might as well save money because it won’t make much of a difference.

I only took classes at a community college during one summer semester where I earned 12 credits, and I still regret not taking more. I probably could have saved around $20,000 by taking more classes at my local community college.

Also, you are most likely just taking general credits at the community college, so it’s not like you would be missing much by taking classes there instead of a college that has a better reputation for the major you are seeking.

If you do decide to go to a community college, always make sure that the 4-year college you plan on attending afterwards will transfer all of the credits. It’s an easy step to take so do not forget! You should do this before you sign up and pay for any classes as well as to make sure that ALL of the classes will transfer succesfully.

 

2. Take advantage of high school classes to lower your college budget.

Many high schools allow you to take college classes to earn both college and high school credits at the same time.

This is something I highly recommend you look into if you are still in high school, as it saves time and is one of the best ways to save money on college costs.

When I was in my senior year in high school, nearly all of my classes were dual enrollment courses where I was earning college and high school credit at the same time. I took AP classes and classes that earned me direct college credit from nearby private universities. I left high school with around 14-18 credit hours (I can’t remember the exact amount). This way I knocked out a whole semester of college. I could’ve taken more, but I decided to take early release from high school and worked 30-40 hours a week as well.

 

3. Take all the credits you can to stay within your college budget.

At many universities, you pay a flat fee. So whether you take 12 credit hours or 18 credit hours, you are paying nearly the exact same price.

For this reason, I always recommend that a student take as many classes as they can if they are going to a college that charges a flat fee tuition.

If you think you can still earn good grades and do whatever else you do on the side, definitely get full use of the college tuition you are paying for!

 

4. Apply for scholarships to lower your college costs.

Before you start your semester, you should always look into scholarships, grants, FAFSA, and more. You usually have to turn in any paperwork around spring time for the following semester, so I highly recommend doing this right now if you are going to college in the fall.

Another myth will be busted right now. Many believe that all scholarships are impossible to have or it means you have to win a contest. That is just a myth.

I received around $16,000 a year in scholarships to the private university I attended. That helped pay for a majority of my college tuition. The scholarships were easy for me to get as they were all just because I earned good grades in high school and scored well on tests. I received scholarships to all of the other colleges I applied for as well just for good grades, so I know they can be found as long as you do well in high school!

There are other ways to find scholarships as well. You can receive scholarships from private organizations, companies in your town, and more. Do a simple Google search and I am sure you will find many free websites that list out possible scholarships for you to apply to.

Tip: Many forget that you usually have to turn in a separate financial aid form directly to your college. Don’t forget to do this by the deadline each year!

 

5. Search for cheaper textbooks to lower your college budget.

Students usually spend anywhere from around $300 to $1,000 on textbooks each semester, depending on the amount of classes they are taking and their major.

For me, many of my classes required more than one book and each book was usually around $200 brand new. This means if I were to buy all of my college textbooks brand new, I probably would have had to spend over $1,000 each semester.

I saved a decent amount of money on college textbooks by renting them and finding them used. Renting them was nice because I just had to pay one fee and didn’t ever have to worry about what to do with the textbook after the class was done, as I only had to return them. There was no worrying about the book being worthless if a new edition came out, which was nice! Buying books used was nice occasionally as well just because sometimes I could make my money back.

I recommend Campus Book Rentals if you are looking for textbook rentals. Their rentals are affordable and they make getting the textbooks you need easy.

Read: How To Save Money On Textbooks + Campus Book Rentals Review

 

6. Skip the high price of living on campus to cut your college budget.

To save more money, I decided to live on my own. I didn’t have the option of living at home after high school and living on campus would have cost me a ton of money.

Instead, I found a very cheap rental house (the house was VERY small and probably could have been considered a tiny home) and was able to somewhat easily commute to work and college from it. I probably saved around $500 a month by living on my own instead of on campus, and I learned a lot by living on my own at a young age as well.

If you can live at home though and want to save money, I highly recommend it if it’s an option for you. You can save thousands of dollars a semester by doing this!

I understand that some are against this because it may impact your “college experience,” but I think most people would be fine not living on campus, especially if it’s not in the budget. You could probably save around $40,000 over the years on your degree by living at home.

How did you cut college costs and control your college budget? How much student loan debt did you have when you graduated?

 

The post 6 Ways I Saved Money On College Costs appeared first on Making Sense Of Cents.

Source: makingsenseofcents.com

How to Start Building Credit Once You Turn 18

Good credit is crucial to unlocking many financial opportunities in life. When you have a great credit score, you can get lower interest rates on car loans, credit cards and mortgages. Some employers and landlords even check credit reports before they make a job offer or approve a resident application. While developing a solid credit history takes time, follow some of these tips on how to establish credit once you turn 18 to get started as soon as possible.

1. Understand the Basics of Credit

Make sure you understand the basics of how credit works. Your credit reports are maintained by three major credit bureaus—Experian, TransUnion and Equifax. It contains data on your current and past debts, payment history, residential history and other facts. This data is supplied by lenders, creditors and businesses where you have accounts.

The information contained in your credit report determines your credit score. Higher credit scores are more attractive to lenders and creditors. The factors that influence your score include:

  • Payment history, which is whether you pay your bills on time
  • Average age of accounts, which is how long you’ve had your accounts open
  • Credit utilization ratio, which is how much of your open credit line you’re currently using
  • Account mix, which demonstrates that you can responsibly manage multiple types of accounts
  • Inquiries, which occur when you apply for new credit

As a new adult, some of these factors may not currently apply to you. However, they can all negatively or positively affect your score, depending on your behavior as a consumer. Educating yourself on credit now helps you avoid costly mistakes in the future.

2. Monitor Your Credit Report and Credit Score

Now that you understand the basics of building credit, you need to start monitoring your report and credit score. Monitoring your credit is one of the best ways to learn what will positively or negatively impact your scores. It also helps you catch inaccuracies or signs of identity theft sooner.

You can check your credit report for free annually with each major credit bureau. As you review your report, look for any negative or inaccurate information that could be screwing up your credit. You can also check your credit score, updated every 14 days, for free at Credit.com.

If you’re really serious about understanding your credit reports and scores, sign up for ExtraCredit. With Track It, you can see 28 of your FICO scores and credit reports from all three credit bureaus.

3. Sign Up for ExtraCredit

ExtraCredit does more than just show you your credit scores. Have you recently started paying rent or utilities? BuildIt will add them as new tradelines with all three credit bureaus. That means you’ll get credit for bills you’re already paying—building your credit profile each month.

Sign Up for ExtraCredit

4. Become an Authorized User

If you have a friend or family member willing to add you as an authorized user on their credit card, you can piggyback off their credit card activity to help establish your credit. Even if you don’t use the card, the account can still land on your credit report and potentially positively impact your score.

This method poses some risks to the primary cardholder and you, the authorized user. If you or the primary cardholder rack up too much debt or miss payments, that activity could end up damaging the credit of both parties.

You should also verify that the credit card company in question reports card activity to the credit file of authorized users. If they don’t, your credit won’t see any benefit.

5. Get a Starter Credit Card

Credit cards are one of the best tools around for building credit, but you might have trouble qualifying for one when you have no credit history. Luckily, there are a few credit card options for young people with little or no credit.

Unsecured Credit Cards: If you don’t have the money to make a security deposit, consider an unsecured credit card such as the Avant Credit Card. This card offers a process that presents you with a credit line based on your creditworthiness before you apply. It also has no penalty or hidden fees—a perfect fit for any young adult’s starter card. You do need at least some fair credit history to be approved, though.

Avant Credit Card

Apply Now

on Avant’s secure website

Card Details
Intro Apr:
N/A


Ongoing Apr:
25.99% (variable)


Balance Transfer:
N/A


Annual Fee:
$39


Credit Needed:
Fair

Snapshot of Card Features
  • No deposit required
  • No penalty APR
  • No hidden fees
  • Fast and easy application process
  • Help strengthen your credit history with responsible use
  • Disclosure: If you are charged interest, the charge will be no less than $1.00. Cash Advance Fee: The greater of $10 or 3% of the amount of the cash advance
  • Avant branded credit products are issued by WebBank, member FDIC

Card Details +

Secured Credit Cards: A secured credit card requires an upfront security deposit to open. Your deposit will typically equal your initial credit limit. For example, a $500 security deposit would get you a $500 credit limit. These cards are easier to qualify for, and you can use them to make purchases, just like traditional credit cards, while also establishing some credit history.

OpenSky® Secured Visa® Credit Card

Apply Now

on Capital Bank’s secure website

Card Details
Intro Apr:
N/A


Ongoing Apr:
17.39% (variable)


Balance Transfer:
N/A


Annual Fee:
$35


Credit Needed:
Fair-Poor-Bad-No Credit

Snapshot of Card Features
  • No credit check necessary to apply. OpenSky believes in giving an opportunity to everyone.
  • The refundable* deposit you provide becomes your credit line limit on your Visa card. Choose it yourself, from as low as $200.
  • Build credit quickly. OpenSky reports to all 3 major credit bureaus.
  • 99% of our customers who started without a credit score earned a credit score record with the credit bureaus in as little as 6 months.
  • We have a Facebook community of people just like you; there is a forum for shared experiences, and insights from others on our Facebook Fan page. (Search “OpenSky Card” in Facebook.)
  • OpenSky provides credit tips and a dedicated credit education page on our website to support you along the way.
  • *View our Cardholder Agreement located at the bottom of the application page for details of the card

Card Details +

6. Make Payments on Time

Making timely payments is the most important thing you can do to build credit, as payment history makes up 35% of your credit score. This applies to credit cards, loans, utilities such as cell phone services and any other account that requires a monthly payment. No matter the account type, a late or missed payment that lands on your credit report can do significant damage to your credit score.

7. Maintain a Low Credit Card Balance

Your credit utilization ratio, or the amount of available credit you have tied up in debt, is another major contributor to your credit score. Most experts recommend keeping your credit card balances below 30% of the available credit limit. Ideally, you should pay your balance off in full each month to avoid interest and keep your utilization low.

8. Get a Loan

Getting a loan just to build credit is generally not a good idea, as you shouldn’t take on debt only for the sake of your credit score. But if you have a valid reason, such as needing a car or money for college, a small loan in your name can help you build credit.

As with credit cards, loans only build a good credit history if you pay them on time every month. You also want to ensure your creditor reports payments to the credit bureau. If you also have a credit card, getting a loan can help improve your account mix, which makes up around 10% of your credit score.

9. Keep It Simple for Now

The more credit cards and loans you open, the higher your chances are of falling into debt. When you’re just starting out, you should probably play it safe and manage one basic credit card and/or small loan until you get the hang of things. Trying to manage too many debts at once could get you in over your head.

Over time, you can start to add other credit cards or loans to the mix, diversifying your credit profile and adding more opportunities to build credit. And because the age of your accounts affects your credit score, just keeping accounts open will help you build credit history in the long run. When you’re starting to figure out how to build your credit, do it slowly, carefully and with a constant eye on your statements and credit reports.

The post How to Start Building Credit Once You Turn 18 appeared first on Credit.com.

Source: credit.com

The Ultimate List of More Than 50 Budget Categories You Must Use

The post The Ultimate List of More Than 50 Budget Categories You Must Use appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

It is no secret that you need a budget.  But, it is imperative that it includes everything.  Take the time to review your spending and don’t leave anything off of it.  Below you will find a list of household budget categories you need to include. Forgetting even one off might be a big mistake.

It is no secret that the number one thing you must do to take control of your finances is to create a budget.  Without one, you really can’t see where your money goes.  Or, more importantly, you don’t get to direct your money to be spent as you would like for it to be!

While there are posts on how to create a budget, one question I get frequently is, “What categories should I include in a budget?”   When you are new to making a budget, something such as a personal budget categories list can help.  I agree.

As you create yours for the first time, it is important you don’t leave off anything important. A successful budget is one that includes a line item for every way you spend your money.

If you are just learning about budgeting, you will want to check out our page — How to Budget.

There, you will learn everything you want to know about budgets and budgeting.

 

To help you get a jump start on with your budget, and to make sure you don’t leave off any categories, download our free budget template.  This form has helped thousands get started with creating a budget.

SIMPLE BUDGET CATEGORIES 

Once you have your form, you are ready to figure out your budget categories!  While you may not have each of these as individual line items on your form, just make sure you include them all somewhere in your budget!

 

DONATIONS OR CHARITY CATEGORIES

These are all of the monthly donations you make to various charities.  Don’t forget about those you may make only once or twice a year as well!

Church
Medical Research
Youth Groups

 

SAVINGS CATEGORIES

While not needed to live, it is crucial that you always pay yourself before you pay anyone else.  Once you meet your necessary expenses, ensure you are saving enough each month.

If you are in your employer’s retirement plan, you pay those before you get your paycheck, so you would not include them.  However, make sure you account for the different types of savings accounts you may have.

Emergency Fund Savings
Annual Fees, such as taxes, insurance, and dues
College Savings
Investments
Christmas/Birthdays/Anniversaries
Additional Retirement (outside of your employer’s plan)

Read More:  Yearly Savings Challenge

 

CATEGORIES FOR HOUSING

No one will forget to add housing to their budget.  But, make sure you include the amount you may save for repairs and other expenses. To figure out how much to budget, look over your prior year spending and divide that total by 12.  You will add this to your savings, but you can track it under your housing budget category.

First Mortgage
Second Mortgage (if applicable)
Property Taxes
Insurance
Home Owner’s Association Dues
Maintenance
Housekeeper/Cleaning
Lawn Care

 

PERSONAL BUDGET UTILITIES CATEGORIES

You can’t live without your water and electricity.  It is essential that you don’t leave any of these off of your budget either!  These are some of the basic budget categories most people will not intend to forget, but just might.

Electricity
Water
Gas/Oil
Sewer
Trash
Cable/Satellite/Streaming Services
Internet (if not part of your cable bill)
Phone

Read more:  How to Lower Your Utility Bills

 

FOOD

You have to eat. There are only two ways that happens  — you cook or you eat out. Make sure you include both of these categories in your budget.

Groceries
Dining Out

 

TRANSPORTATION CATEGORIES

You have to be able to get around.  That doesn’t always mean a vehicle as it could mean using other means of transportation.  Whatever method you use, make sure you include all of those expenses in your budget.

Remember that you may not have to pay for some of these items each month, but it is essential you budget for them monthly so that the funds are available when needed.

Vehicle payment (make sure you include all payments for all vehicles)
Fuel
Insurance
Taxes
Tags/Licensing
Maintenance
Parking Fees
Taxi/Bus Fares

 

CLOTHING

A line item many people leave off of their budget is clothing.  They forget that it is a necessary expense.  While this doesn’t mean you should go and buy new clothes all of the time, it does allow you to replace items which are worn out.

It is also essential that parents include this item as kids need clothes a bit more frequently.

Adult Clothing
Kids Clothing

 

CATEGORIES FOR HEALTH

Don’t forget your health expenses when determining a budget.  Make sure you include the money you pay towards your co-pays during the year.

Health Insurance
Dental Insurance
Eye Insurance
Doctor Visits
Dental Visits
Optometrist
Medications
Deductible Savings

 

PERSONAL ITEMS CATEGORIES

Personal is a “catch-all” category which may contain much of your discretionary spending!  Some of the most common types you need to include:

Haircuts/Manicures/Pedicures
Life Insurance
Child Care/Babysitting
Toiletries (if not included in your grocery budget above)
Household Items (if you did not already include in your groceries budget above)
Education/Tuition
Dry Cleaning/Laundry
School Dues/Supplies
Magazines
Gym Memberships
Organization Dues
Postage
Pet Care (food, grooming, shots, boarding)
Photos (school and family photos)
Random Spending (always useful as a way to pay for the things you may not have broken out in your budget)

 

RECREATION

We all love to spend some time doing things we love.  Don’t forget to include your entertainment category when determining your budget.

Entertainment (movies/concerts)
Crafts
Hobbies
Parties
Vacations

 

DEBTS

Once you pay off your debt, these will go away entirely and will no longer be needed.  You can learn how to get out of debt and get started with that (once you have your budget).

Credit Cards (all debt)
Unsecured loans
Home equity loans
Student loans
Medical loans

 

Now you have the categories you need for your budget!  Take the first step in getting control of your finances by putting this to work for you.

caclulator on desk to figure budget categories

The post The Ultimate List of More Than 50 Budget Categories You Must Use appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom.

Source: pennypinchinmom.com

How I Paid Off $38,000 In Student Loan Debt In 7 Months

How I Paid Off $38,000 In Student Loan Debt In 7 MonthsLately, I have received many questions asking how I was able to pay off my student loans so quickly. I haven’t talked much about my student loans since I paid them off in July of 2013, but I know many struggle with their student loan repayment plan each and every day.

Due to this, it is a topic I am always happy to cover. Paying off your student loans is a wonderful feeling and I want to help everyone else experience the same.

 

Background on my student loans.

To start off, I am going to provide a quick background on my student loans.

I worked full-time all throughout college. I worked as a retail manager from when I was a teenager until I graduated with my two undergraduate degrees (I was a double major). Then, I was lucky and found a financial analyst position right when I graduated. I took around six months off from college, then I went back to get my Finance MBA, all while still working full-time and building my business.

Even though I worked full-time, I didn’t really put any money towards my student loan debt while I was in college.

Instead, I spent money on ridiculous things like going to my favorite Mexican restaurant WAY too many times each week and spending money on clothing that I didn’t need.

I didn’t have a realistic budget back then, at least not a good one. I didn’t think about my student loan repayment plan at all either!

So, when I finished my Finance MBA, I finally came to terms with the fact that I needed to start getting real about my student loans. I had six months after the day I graduated with my Finance MBA until my student loans would come out of deferment.

I knew I had to create an action plan to get rid of my student loans.

And that’s when I took a HUGE gulp and decided to add up the total of what I owed.

After adding all of my student loans together, I realized I had $38,000 in student loan debt. No, this might not be as much as some of the crazy stories you hear out there where others have hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of student loan debt, but I wasn’t exactly near the average of what others owed either. I also wasn’t happy because I kept thinking about how I had been working full-time for many years, yet I didn’t even put a dent on my student loans.

After totaling what I owed, I decided to buckle down and start my debt payoff near the end of 2012.

I ended up finishing paying off my student loans in early July of 2013, which means it took right around seven months for me to pay them off completely.

It’s still something I cannot believe is true. I always thought I would have student loans hanging over my head for years, so I am extremely grateful that I was able to eliminate them so quickly.

Now, you may be wondering “Well, how do I do the same?” Or you might even be thinking that it’s not possible for you.

However, I believe you CAN do the same and that it IS possible for you.

For some, it might take longer to pay off your student loans or it might even take less. It depends on how much you owe, how much time you can spend on making more money, and honestly, it also depends on how bad you want it.

Related tip: I highly recommend SoFi for student loan refinancing. You can lower the interest rate on your student loans significantly by using SoFi which may help you shave thousands off your student loan bill over time.

Related content: How Do Student Loans Work?

Here are my tips to pay off your student loans quickly:

 

Do you know how much student loan debt you have?

Like I said above, the first thing that made me jumpstart my student loan repayment plan was the fact that I took the time to add up how much student loan debt I had.

It shocked me so much that I probably wanted to throw up. That’s good though because it can be a good source of motivation for most people. I know it was for me!

When you add up your student loans, do not just take a guess. Actually pull up each student loan and tally everything down to the exact penny.

I highly recommend that you check out Personal Capital (a free service) if you are interested in gaining control of your financial situation. Personal Capital is very similar to Mint.com, but 100 times better as it allows you to gain control of your investment and retirement accounts, whereas Mint.com does not. Personal Capital allows you to aggregate your financial accounts so that you can easily see your financial situation, your cash flow, detailed graphs, and more. You can connect accounts such as your mortgage, bank accounts, credit card accounts, investment accounts, retirement accounts, and more, and it is FREE.

 

Understand your student loans.

There are many people out there who do not fully understand their student loans. There are many things you should do your research on so that you can create the best student loan repayment plan.

This mainly includes:

  • Your interest rate. Some student loans have fixed interest rates, whereas others might have variable rates. You’ll want to figure out what the interest rate on your loans are because that may impact the student loan repayment plan you decide on. For example, you might choose to pay off your student loans that have the highest interest rates first so that you can pay less money over time.
  • Student loan reimbursements. Some employers will give you money to put towards your student loans, but you should always do your research when it comes to this area. Some employers will require that you work for them for a certain amount of time, you have great grades, good attendance, and they might have other requirements as well. There are many employers out there who will pay your student loans back (fully or partially), so definitely look into this option.
  • Auto-payments. For most student loans, you can probably auto-pay them and receive a discount. Always look into this as you may be able to lower your interest rate by 0.25% on each of your student loans.

 

Create a budget.

If you don’t have one already, then you should create a budget immediately.

First, include your actual income and expenses for each month. This will help show you how much money you have left over each month and how much money should be going towards your student loan debt each month.

 

Cut your budget to create a quicker student loan repayment plan.

The next step is to cut your budget so that you can have a better student loan repayment plan. Even though you may have just created a budget, you should go through it line by line and see what you really do not need to be spending money on.

There’s probably SOMETHING that can be cut.

You might not have even realized it until after you wrote down exactly how much money you were shoveling towards nonsense until now. However, now is better than never!

We worked towards cutting our budget as much as we could. I can’t remember exactly how much we cut it by, but I know that it was enough to where I felt like I was putting a dent in my student loans.

Even if all you can cut is $100 each month, that is much better than nothing. That’s $1,200 a year right there!

Side note: If you are still in college, I highly recommend that you check out Campus Book Rentals. It allows you to get your text books for cheap. I almost ALWAYS rented my text books and it saved me a ton of money!

 

Earn more money as a part of your student loan repayment plan.

The month I paid off my student loans was a month where I earned over $11,000 in extra income. While this does sound crazy, I did start off by making just $0 in extra income. Everyone has to start somewhere.

Even if $11,000 a month isn’t possible for you, I’m sure something is. If you can make an extra $1,000 a month in extra income, that can help you knock out your student loans in no time.

Related articles:

  • 75+ Ways To Make Extra Money
  • 10 Ways To Make Money Online From The Comfort of Your Home
  • 10 Things I’ve Done To Make Extra Money
  • Ways To Make An Extra $1,000 A Month
  • How to Earn Extra Income Part 1

 

Pay more than the minimum payment each month.

The point of all of the above is to help you pay off your student loans. However, you can always go a little bit further and pay off your student loans more quickly. The key to this is that you will need to pay more than the minimum each month for you to speed up your student loan repayment plan process.

It may sound hard, but it really doesn’t have to be. Whatever extra you can afford, you should think about putting it towards your student loans. You may be able to shave years of your student loans!

How much student loan debt do you have? What’s your student loan repayment plan?

The post How I Paid Off $38,000 In Student Loan Debt In 7 Months appeared first on Making Sense Of Cents.

Source: makingsenseofcents.com

Secured vs. Unsecured Loans: Here’s the Difference

Whether you’re trying to buy a home or looking to get a college degree, you may need to take out a loan to finance your goals. If you’re seeking out your first loan, know that borrowing money is a common practice and you don’t need a degree in economics to understand it! Learning more about loans and the different types can help you make informed decisions and take control of your finances.

Loans take many forms but they all fall within two common categories: secured vs. unsecured loans. Whether you’re approved for either type of loan depends on your creditworthiness. Creditworthiness refers to how responsible you are at repaying debt and if it’s worthwhile or risky to grant you new credit. It’s helpful to be aware of your credit prior to seeking out a loan so you know where you stand.

Now that you’re familiar with the role creditworthiness plays in getting a loan, let’s discuss the differences between secured and unsecured loans, the advantages and disadvantages of each, and which one may be right for you.

What’s the Difference Between Secured vs. Unsecured Loans?

What’s the Difference Between Secured vs. Unsecured Loans?

The main difference between secured and unsecured loans is how they use collateral. Collateral is when something of economic value is used as security for a debt, in the event that the debt is not repaid. Usually collateral comes in the form of material property, such as a car, house, or other real estate. If the debt is not repaid, the collateral is seized and sold to repay all or a portion of the debt.

Key Difference: A secured loan requires collateral, while an unsecured loan doesn’t require collateral.

What Is a Secured Loan?

A secured loan requires collateral as security in case you fail to repay your debt. If secured debt is not repaid, the collateral is taken. In addition to seizing collateral, lenders can start debt collection, file negative credit information on your report, and sue you for outstanding debt. This generally makes secured loans more risky for the borrower.

Conversely, collateral decreases the risk for lenders, especially when loaning money to those with little to no credit history or low creditworthiness. Less risk means that lenders may offer some leeway regarding interest rates and borrowing limits. See the list below to review other typical secured loan characteristics.

Characteristics of a Secured Loan:

For borrowers:

  • Presence of collateral
  • Typically more risky
  • May require a down payment
  • May sell property to repay loan
  • Generally lower interest rates
  • Longer repayment period
  • Higher borrowing limits
  • Easier to obtain for those with poor or little credit history

For lenders:

  • Typically less risky
  • Lender can take your collateral
  • Lender can hold the title to your property until loan is repaid

Secured Loan Examples

The most common uses of a secured loan are to finance large purchases such as a mortgage. Usually, these loans can only be used for a specific, intended purchase like a house, car, or boat. A home equity loan is another example of a secure loan. Some loans like business loans or debt consolidation can be secured or unsecured.

Secured Loan Examples

What Is an Unsecured Loan?

An unsecured loan doesn’t require collateral to secure the amount borrowed. This type of loan is granted based on creditworthiness and income. High creditworthiness makes an unsecured loan more accessible.

The absence of collateral makes this type of loan less risky for borrowers and much riskier for lenders. If unsecured debt is not repaid, the lender cannot seize property automatically. They must engage in debt collection, report negative credit information, or sue. As a result of the increased risk, unsecured loans have characteristics that attempt to reduce the risk. These may include higher interest rates or lower borrowing limits, and you can see more in the list below.

Characteristics of an Unsecured Loan:

For borrower:

  • No collateral required
  • Typically less risky
  • Qualify based on credit and income
  • Stricter conditions to qualify
  • Generally higher interest rates
  • Lower borrowing limits

For lender:

  • Typically more risky
  • Lender can’t take property right away if you default

Unsecured Loan Examples

Common unsecured loans include credit cards, personal loans, student loans, and medical debt. Debt consolidation and business loans can also be unsecured. In each of these instances, collateral is not required and you are trusted to repay your unsecured debt.

Unsecured Loan Examples

Advantages and Disadvantages to Consider

When it comes to deciding on the type of loan you need, it’s important to consider the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Secured Loans

Secured loans present advantages for repayment, interest, and borrowing amount, but have disadvantages regarding a borrower’s risk and limitations of use.

Advantages

  1. Bigger borrowing limits
  2. Less risk for lenders usually means lower interest rates for borrowers
  3. Longer repayment period
  4. Available tax deductions for interest paid on certain loans (e.g., a mortgage)

Disadvantages

  1. Risky for borrower (potential for loss of collateral like home, car, stocks, or bonds)
  2. Specifically for intended purpose (e.g., a home, but home equity loans are an exception)

Unsecured Loans

Unsecured loans can be advantageous for borrowers regarding risk and time, but they pose a disadvantage when it comes to interest rates and stricter qualifications.

Advantages

  1. Less risky for borrower
  2. Useful loan if you don’t own property to use as collateral
  3. Quicker application process than for a secured loan (e.g., a credit card)

Disadvantages

  1. More risky for lenders usually means higher interest rates for borrowers
  2. Hard to qualify for if you have low creditworthiness or inconsistent income (can qualify with a cosigner)

Take a look at the chart below to compare the key advantages and disadvantages between secured and unsecured loans.

Secured Loans

Unsecured Loans

Advantages

• Lower interest rates
• Higher borrowing limits
• Easier to qualify
• No risk of losing collateral
• Less risky for borrower

Disadvantages

• Risk losing collateral
• More risky for borrower
• Higher interest rates
• Lower borrowing limits
• Harder to qualify

Which Loan Type Is Best for You?

After considering the advantages and disadvantages of both loan types, it’s helpful to know which one is the best for certain circumstances. Here are some common contexts in which one may be better than the other.

  • A secured loan may be best if you’re trying to make a large property purchase or don’t have the best credit. The piece of property that you are purchasing can be used as collateral if you don’t already own other property. Additionally, this loan is more accessible for you if you have low creditworthiness and may be more advantageous with lower interest rates.
  • An unsecured loan may be best if you have high creditworthiness and a steady income. High creditworthiness helps you meet strict qualification criteria and can also help you obtain better interest rates (given that this type is characterized by higher interest).

Overall, secured and unsecured loans are each useful in different situations. Remember that the key difference is that unsecured loans don’t need collateral, while secured loans do. Secured loans are less risky for the lender and may allow for some advantageous repayment conditions. On the other hand, unsecured loans are risky for the lender, and they often come with stricter conditions that try to lessen that risk.

It is important to make smart financial decisions such as repaying debt on time and maintaining a good credit history. High creditworthiness is the key to getting the best conditions on any loan. No matter your circumstances, identifying which loan type is best for you depends on your specific credit and goals. Visit our loan center for help in deciding which loan is right for you.

Sources: Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

 

The post Secured vs. Unsecured Loans: Here’s the Difference appeared first on MintLife Blog.

Source: mint.intuit.com

Fed: Credit card balances dipped by $3 billion in December

Credit card balances edged down in December, even as consumers engaged in holiday shopping, as uncertainty about a second round of stimulus checks extended to the latter part of the month.

Consumer revolving debt – which is mostly based on credit card balances – was down $3 billion on a seasonally adjusted basis in December to $975.9 billion, according to the Fed’s G. 19 consumer credit report released Feb. 5.

In December, credit card balances were off 3.6% on an annualized basis, following November’s revised 0.8% dip and October’s 6.7% drop, which came on the heels of September’s 3.2% annualized gain.

The Fed also reported that student loan debt outstanding for the fourth quarter rose to $1.707 trillion, from the third quarter’s $1.704 trillion. And auto loan debt outstanding gained to $1.228 trillion, from the third quarter’s $1.219 trillion.

Total consumer debt outstanding – which includes student loans and auto loans, as well as revolving debt – continued to grow and rose $9.7 billion to $4.184 trillion in December, a 2.8% annualized gain.

For the entire year, credit card balances were down 11.2%.

Card balances had been growing before the coronavirus impacted consumer spending and bank lending in 2020. They dipped below the $1 trillion mark last May, for the first time since September 2017.

See related: 51% of consumers accrued more debt during the pandemic

ABA sees brighter days ahead for credit availability

The American Bankers Association reports, based on input provided by chief economists of large North American banks to its credit conditions index for the first quarter of 2021, that credit conditions (both credit quality and availability) have rebounded from their lows of last summer.

However, all three components of the index (the headline credit index, the consumer credit index and the business credit index) remain below 50, which is not a robust index reading. It indicates that while bank economists expect credit conditions to remain “soft” in the coming six months, they are less pessimistic than they were in September 2020 when the ABA  conducted its last credit conditions survey.

The consumer credit index component of the survey gained to 45.3, its highest level since mid-2019. Economists are optimistic about both the availability and quality of consumer credit compared to September. They expect credit to be more available to consumers in the coming six months, although a small majority expects credit quality to decline.

“Although credit quality is still expected to worsen over the first half of the year for both consumers and businesses, the overall outlook for credit markets has improved significantly since the summer and fall,” said Rob Strand, ABA senior economist. “As widespread inoculations against the virus and new fiscal stimulus measures help heal the economy, banks will continue to work closely with policymakers, consumers and businesses to ensure that affordable credit remains available and recovery strengthens.”

Fed reports easing of credit card lending standards in fourth quarter

According to the Fed’s senior loan officer opinion survey on bank lending practices for January 2021 (which is based on input related to the fourth quarter of 2020), a “moderate net share of banks” reported that they had eased up on credit card loans.

As a result, a “modest net share of banks” also hiked up their credit limits on credit card accounts. And a “moderate net share of banks” reported that there was higher demand for credit card loans during the fourth quarter.

As for the outlook, a “significant net share of banks” is expected to ease up on their standards for credit card loans. They are doing so in anticipation of an improvement in their loan portfolios’ credit quality, as well as a hike in their tolerance for risk.

Also, the New York Fed’s survey of consumer expectations for December 2020 finds that consumers are less concerned about the possibility of missing a minimum debt payment in the coming three months. The average perceived probability of this occurrence dipped to 10.5% for December, from November’s 10.9%.

See related: What happens when you miss a credit card payment?

Jobs edge up in January

The New York Fed survey also finds that on average fewer consumers expect the unemployment rate to be higher a year from now, with this probability declining to 38.9%, from November’s 40.1%.

While the average perceived probability of losing a job in the coming 12 months rose up a bit to 15% (mainly on account of those without a college degree), respondents were also more likely to leave their job voluntarily. However, they were less optimistic about landing a new job if they lost their current ones.

The U.S employment situation was about stable in January, with the economy adding 49,000 jobs, the government reported Feb. 5. “The labor market continued to reflect the impact of the coronavirus pandemic and efforts to contain it,” according to the Department of Labor’s employment report media release. The unemployment rate dipped 0.4 percentage points to 6.3% and average hourly earnings were up $0.06 to $29.96. Also, the job numbers for both November and December were revised down, with November down 77,000 jobs (to 264,000) and December losing an additional 87,000 jobs (to minus 227,000).

In his daily email commentary, Ian Shepherdson, chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, noted, “Coupled with the -159K net revision, this is a significantly softer report than expected, at least in terms of payrolls. Bulls will cite the large and unexpected drop in the unemployment rate, but two-third(s) of the decline was due to a 405K drop in the size of the labor force – a sign of discouragement – while household employment rose 201K.”

He added that “the labor market was frozen at the start of the year, and is completely dependent on the pace of reopening, which in turn is contingent on the speed and sustainability of the fall in hospitalizations.”

Source: creditcards.com