Tag Archive: holidays

The 20 Best Neighborhoods in Salt Lake City in 2021

What started as a pioneer settlement has now grown into one of the most desirable cities in the western United States. Salt Lake City is one of, if not the best places to live in Utah. Due to recent events and changes in the remote work environment, crowds are flocking to the valley to take up permanent residence and it’s also quickly becoming a hub for tech companies.

While there truly isn’t a terrible place to live in the city, some areas are better than others when it comes to shopping, dining, architecture, views and a few other factors. Here are the best neighborhoods in Salt Lake City to give you an idea of what most residents enjoy about where they live.

Salt Lake City.

The Avenues

Potentially the most desirable neighborhood in Salt Lake, The Avenues have a little bit of everything. It’s nestled in the northeastern corner of the valley, offering great views of the city. Plus, its charming historic homes and family-owned restaurants create a quiet, quaint atmosphere.

Since it’s just at the foot of the mountains, there are plenty of hiking trails literally at your doorstep. There are many parks and walkable areas, perfect for anyone wanting an active lifestyle or who has pets that like spending time outdoors.

Sugarhouse

Full of unique restaurants, bars and coffee shops, Sugarhouse is a lively neighborhood where you’ll never be bored. With the University of Utah and Westminster close by, many students live in the area. However, there’s also a mix of established families and young professionals in the area.

Sugarhouse is walk- and bike-friendly. Most major roads have bike lanes and wide sidewalks to keep them safe for bikers and pedestrians. Plus, everything you could ever need is within walking distance. Whether you’re looking for groceries, boutiques or a cool cafe to spend the afternoon in, it’s close by.

Capitol Hill in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Capitol Hill

Capitol Hill, named for its location around the state capitol building, tends to attract many young professionals. It has plenty of parks for outdoor enjoyment and bars for indoor entertainment and mingling.

The homes and apartments in this neighborhood are mostly older buildings that have gone through renovations. While the buildings maintain their original charm, so you’ll see that they have a clean, modernized touch. Capitol Hill also has some of the most incredible views of the city, overlooking the entire valley. Notably, it has views of downtown and Temple Square. This view is especially stunning during the winter holidays, the Fourth of July and the local Pioneer Day celebrations.

Downtown

Salt Lake City’s most active area is certainly Downtown. There are more restaurants, cafes, bars than anyone could probably visit in their lifetime. There’s also great shopping—anything from small boutiques to large commercial shopping centers.

Many people both live and work downtown, often walking, biking or taking the UTA TRAX whenever they need to get somewhere. In fact, the downtown area has some of the best walk, bike and overall transit scores in the valley. Its walk, bike and transit scores are 87, 93 and 69, respectively. So owning a car is purely optional for residents here.

9th and 9th

The coveted 9th and 9th neighborhood is a well-known shopping and eating hangout. Filled with boutiques and delicious restaurants, it has a very calm, leisurely feel to it. The relaxing vibe is partially created by the amazing art that is around every corner. The other great part of 9th and 9th is the fun people you can find behind every door.

Homes in this area seem a little on the small side, but they’re both funky and chic. Pulling from the old architecture of original houses built in the early 1900s, the homes mix in newer stylings to stay modern.

Salt Lake City.

Yalecrest

Yalecrest initially attracts students who are attending school across the street — at the University of Utah. But once they finish their studies, they end up staying years after the fact. Its easily walkable streets are very safe. And the neighborhood has enough local stores and restaurants that owning a car isn’t necessary for day-to-day life. Plus, it’s near the UTA TRAX and bus lines in case you do need to travel further.

If you’re a fan of Tudor-style architecture, Yalecrest is a visual treat. It’s not a typical cookie-cutter suburb — it’s full of unique homes of all designs, complete with brick and exposed wood beams.

East Bench

The East Bench neighborhood is known for its unobstructed views stretching all the way over to the Great Salt Lake. The neighborhood is over the side of the eastern mountains lining the valley. While many of its residents are older and more established, there are also many younger families taking up residency.

East Bench is further away from the busy city, but it’s still close to everything you could need. It’s also only a 10-minute drive to downtown, where there’s great entertainment and food. Residents are out of the constant city bustle but they still enjoy the city perks.

Temple Square in Salt Lake City.

Temple Square

At the heart of downtown Salt Lake, Temple Square and the surrounding streets are surprisingly calm and kept very neat and tidy. Many members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints live and work in the area (depending on what you’re after, this could be a pro or a con).

You’ll find lots of church history museums, along with other church-owned properties. Such properties include a large tabernacle, a conference center, and, of course, the Salt Lake Temple. The area is very walkable and near lots of public transportation, including the UTA TRAX and FrontRunner.

Sugar House Park

Perhaps the best park in Salt Lake, Sugar House Park is not only big, but it’s beautiful. It boasts beautiful views of the mountains, lots of trees, a pond and various sports courts.

The Sugar House Park neighborhood is also near a large shopping and dining center right off the freeway. Everything is at your fingertips and it makes owning a car unnecessary.

Westminster

As its name suggests, the Westminster neighborhood surrounds Westminster College. It’s no surprise that there are many students living in the area. However, students aren’t the only ones enjoying the neighborhood.

Being so close to a shopping and dining hub, this neighborhood draws in the crowds. Here, you can enjoy good food and fun bars, many of which have classic bar games like pool and darts. You’ve also got a few parks nearby. Liberty Park is one of the best, there’s always an event happening and you can catch live music, markets and festivals.

The Country Club

Right off the freeway at the mouth of Parley’s Canyon, The Country Club is a classy neighborhood full of larger homes. By “larger homes,” we mean in comparison to the other smaller historic homes typically found in Salt Lake.

This neighborhood encircles a large country club with a golf course. Many of its residents fall under the “well established” category of older folks who have done well for themselves. You won’t find better-kept homes or yards anywhere in the valley and even strolling through the streets is a treat in and of itself.

Salt Lake City neighborhood.

Highland Park

Highland Park is a fun, eclectic area with a combination of shopping and dining like you’ve never seen before. Instead of boutiques and chain restaurants, you’ll find the likes of stores selling plants, yard decor and secondhand books, along with classic Dutch and Greek cuisine.

It is truly a one-of-a-kind neighborhood that transports residents and visitors to different places and times. However, if that’s not your cup of tea, you’re right off the freeway and less than 15 minutes from downtown.

East Central

Sandwiched between downtown and the University of Utah, East Central is home to many young residents. Many of those living here are attending school or just starting out in their careers. Walking is a reasonable mode of transportation and you’ll find not only everything you need to live nearby but the added benefits of concerts, live theater shows and museums.

Those living in East Central are in it for both work and play, and you’ll find a good community of social beings there.

Wasatch Hollow

The mellow, tree-lined streets of Wasatch Hollow are home to a wide range of people of all ages and various backgrounds. This neighborhood has a close sense of community, where people live for a long time and watch out for each other.

There are plenty of parks for taking a walk or spending a nice afternoon. And the many coffee shops scattered throughout the streets provide a place to meet other locals, see art from up-and-coming artists and experience live music.

This Is The Place Heritage Park.

Sunnyside East

Like East Bench, Sunnyside East has amazing views across the valley to the Great Salt Lake. However, it is slightly more secluded. This neighborhood contains the Hogle Zoo and This Is The Place Heritage Park, where you can attend various events all year long, including holidays — such as Zoo Lights and a German-style Christmas market.

Because it’s further from things, you’ll likely need a car if you live here. But the proximity to multiple hiking trails and stunning views of both the mountains above and the city below are worth the trade-off.

Bonneville Hills

Adjacent to the Bonneville Golf Course, Bonneville Hills is in a prime location near just about everything. It’s only a few minutes from downtown, the University of Utah, the Hogle Zoo, This Is The Place Heritage Park, restaurants, bars, cafes, shopping — you name it and it’s within reasonable walking distance or a short drive.

Although it’s reasonably close to the University of Utah, residents of the neighborhood include families and young professionals, with only a few students in the mix.

Park in Salt Lake City, UT.

Central City

Central City is full of young professionals who bring a vibrant, artistic vibe with them. Here you’ll find loads of indie coffee shops and cafes, many of which have extraordinary menus that cater to the residents of the neighborhood.

Because Central City is near downtown, there are many opportunities to experience live performances of all kinds, whether it’s music or comedy, and there’s lots of local art displayed in coffee shops, painted onto buildings and in galleries throughout the city.

Liberty Wells

With a good mix of young, old and everything in between, you’ll meet people from all walks of life in Liberty Wells. It’s also close to just about everything and has been seeing lots of improvements throughout the neighborhood, including new apartment buildings to provide housing for even more people in the area.

And although new buildings are popping up, there are still plenty of the old ones still standing, providing a good balance between vintage and modern architecture. Like many other neighborhoods in Salt Lake, Liberty Wells doesn’t lack food, drink or good company.

University District

Tucked in the eastern corner of Salt Lake, just inside the hills is the University of Utah and the University District. While many students live in this area, there are also residents who work at the University of Utah. Those working for the University include a wide range of careers, not just teaching — there’s a hospital and various research centers connected to the university.

While you’re slightly further away from most shopping and dining, it’s just a few minutes down the road if you’re ever in the mood for it.

Red Iguana in Salt Lake City, UT.

Photo source: The Red Iguana Restaurant / Facebook

Fairpark

Fairpark is one of the more culturally diverse neighborhoods in Salt Lake City and with that comes some of the best culturally diverse restaurants in the valley. It’s home to one of the city’s most well-known restaurants, the Red Iguana, which is typically packed most evenings, but well worth the wait!

Apart from the food, Fairpark is near the heart of the city, so entertainment and nightlife are never far, and it’s near the freeway, giving access to anywhere else around Salt Lake, including ski resorts and hiking trails.

Which Salt Lake City neighborhood fits you?

These are only a few of the many neighborhoods in Salt Lake City and each of them has its own unique combination of offerings to residents. It’s important to choose a neighborhood that fits your personality and lifestyle, whether you’re buying a home for the long term or renting an apartment for a shorter period. With so many great options, you can find apartments for rent in Salt Lake City in a neighborhood that suits you!

The post The 20 Best Neighborhoods in Salt Lake City in 2021 appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

Home Burglary Statistics: How Safe Are You?

Do you feel safe in your home? What about when you’re not there? Home security is an everyday concern for many, so it’s important that you are taking the proper precautions to protect your valuables and loved ones. To help you understand the patterns and behavior of burglars, we have a guide on burglary statistics and how to safeguard your home.

Are people securing their homes?

We surveyed 1,000 Americans about their home security and found that:

  • 70 percent of people have security measures in place to keep their home from being burglarized
  • Almost as many people lock their doors and windows when they are home (40 percent) compared to when they aren’t (46 percent) home
  • Only 22 percent of respondents indicated that they use an alarm system and 22 percent said they use video cameras
  • 24 percent of respondents said they owned self-defense equipment

graphic that shows what americans do to protect their home from a burglary

When it comes to securing their homes, respondents indicated that they are more likely to use old-fashioned techniques such as deadlocks (40 percent) on their doors rather than relying on technology such as alarm systems (22 percent) or video cameras (22 percent).

Seasonal break-in concerns

The majority of respondents (56 percent) were most worried about a home burglary in the summer. Half as many (26 percent) were concerned about winter and only 9 percent were worried about spring and 9 percent in the fall. These concerns align with seasonal burglary statistics. According to the FBI, burglaries are most likely to occur during the summer months, between noon and 4 p.m.

graphic that shows seasonal break-in concerns

Despite the tendency for people to take precautions by having self-defense equipment and locking doors when they’re inside, a majority of break-ins happen when people are not there to protect the home.

Preventing a seasonal break-ins

The most break-ins occur in the summer months. This is when Americans are most likely to be on vacation or outside enjoying a sunny day. The second most popular season for break-ins is winter. During the holidays, people take trips to visit family and are away from their homes. This is also the time of year when they have valuable presents in their homes.

To prevent holiday break-ins this season:

  • Leave lights on a timer so it looks like you are home throughout the day. Break-ins are most likely to occur between noon and 4 p.m. If you aren’t home during those hours, leave lights or music on a timer so it seems like you are.
  • Don’t leave signs that you are gone such as mail piled up in the mailbox or garbage cans out in the street for too long. The average break-in lasts between eight to 10 minutes. Leaving signs you are gone lets a burglar know they have plenty of time to steal your belongings.
  • Don’t leave boxes from your holiday gifts on the curb. Forty-seven percent of burglaries aren’t planned. Someone might be passing by and see your new TV or PlayStation box on the curb which triggers them to try to break in.
  • Avoid posting that you are out of town on social media. Eighty-five percent of burglars know their victims so they could be following your public social media account.

Burglaries statistics by state

Wondering how your state compares? The FBI has a granular look at crime rates in your state. Below are the top 10 states with the most and least burglaries per hundred thousand residents in 2018.

states with the most and least break-ins per capita

Burglary vs. robbery

It is easy to misconstrue a burglary from a robbery. While they may seem similar, they are two very distinct crimes that have different implications and investigative processes.

Burglary is classified as a property crime, whereas a robbery is classified as a violent crime.

According to the FBI Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program, a burglary is an “unlawful or forcible entry or attempted entry of a structure with the intent to commit a felony or theft.” The specifics of a burglary is relative based on your state laws.

On the other hand, a robbery is classified as “taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.”

Since robberies are classified as violent crimes, if someone is convicted of a robbery they will find that it carries a more severe sentence than a burglary.

Additional burglary statistics

In 2018, the U.S. Department of Justice reported that there were 1.3 million household burglaries, which was a 4.72 percent increase from the previous year. It’s important to be aware of when they happen so you can reduce your risk.

1. Burglaries are most likely to occur during the middle of the day

According to the FBI, in 2018 there were 346,312 daytime burglaries compared to 218,028 burglaries that occurred at night.

This is most likely because the daytime is when your home is left unoccupied. People have daily routines. Criminals are able to track this and take advantage of the times you aren’t home.

2. Burglaries are most likely to happen in the summer months

Seasonality can impact the number of burglaries that occur. These crimes are most likely to occur during the summer months. This is most likely due to a combination of good weather, longer days and an increase in vacations. With more daylight, there is a larger window of opportunity for burglars to break into homes.

We found that the majority of survey respondents (54 percent) indicated that they are most concerned about home burglaries during the summer months.

burglar climbing fence

3 Burglaries are more likely to occur in rural states

According to the FBI, New Mexico, Mississippi and Oklahoma have the highest burglary rate per 100,000 residents. In contrast, Virginia, New York and New Hampshire have the lowest.

4. A burglary occurs every 23 seconds

According to burglary statistics from the FBI, burglaries happen every 23 seconds. This means, there are nearly three homes burglarized every minute and 3,757 burglaries each day.

burglar stealing jewelry

5. Your bedroom is most likely to be the target of a burglary

Burglars have to be strategic with their time, and this includes targeting the rooms that are most valuable. According to the American Society of Criminology, in two-story homes, burglars will bypass the living areas and head straight for the upstairs bedrooms where they will find the most coveted items.

When scouring the bedroom for your belongings, burglars gravitate toward small, valuable items. Rather than big bulky items like TVs that are difficult to carry, they steal small items that can fit into their pockets in order to avoid unwanted attention as they exit the home.

6. The average cost of a burglary is $2,799

The cost of a burglary is steep. At $2,799 this could set apartment renters back a couple months’ rent. Many renters get renters insurance so they can recoup these losses if burglary were to happen. While it is possible to get back your monetary loss, the feeling of security in your house is harder to recover.

breaking in

7. White men are most likely to break into your home

According to the FBI, 80.4 percent of men are found to be the ones breaking in compared to only 19.6 percent of women.

When looking at race or ethnicity in 2018, the FBI found that 68.1 percent of all offenders were Caucasian, 29.4 percent were African American,1.2 percent were American Indian or Alaska Native, 1.1 percent were Asian and 0.2 percent were Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander.

8. Only 23 percent of U.S. households are professionally monitored

According to senior analyst Dina Abdelrazik at Parks Associates, only 23 percent of all U.S. households with broadband internet have a professionally monitored security system and 2.5 percent have a self-monitored system.

person looking at home security system

How to prevent a break-in

While thieves can be tricky, there are precautions you can take to prevent a break-in in your home. Here are some ways to prevent a break-in.

Install a home security system

The installation of a home security system not only will help secure your home, but it will also give you more peace of mind when you are away. Many systems include video cameras that allow you to see who is on your property at all times of the day.

Park your car in the driveway

This can be an indicator that you are home and burglars will be hesitant to break in fear that they will encounter someone. If you are on vacation, have your neighbor use your driveway as a parking spot to deter any possible burglars.

Lock doors and windows

Locking all points of entry will provide an additional layer of protection when you are away from your home. If you leave a door unlocked or window cracked it will be an invitation for any intruder looking for an easy target.

Install timers for your lights

Even if you are away from your home, putting your lights on timers can give the illusion that someone is home, which can deter an intruder from breaking in.

Be careful on social media

Social media can be a way that burglars track you. Posting that you are at a coffee shop or on vacation will let them know when your home is free to attack. Be cognizant of your social media use, especially when you are not home.

Advertise your dog

Your dog can deter a burglar even if it’s harmless. A simple “beware of dog” sign can make a burglar second guess if they should break-in.

Don’t let the mail build-up

Allowing your mail to pile up is a clear indicator that you have not been home for quite some time. This will make your home an easy target.

Hide ladders and tools

Don’t give burglars any accessories to break into your home. Hide or keep your tools in a safe place where no one can access them but you.

Now that you are more aware of the upward trend in home burglaries in the past years. Be sure to take the necessary precautions to better secure your home or apartment. It is always better to be prepared than to realize you have been the victim of a burglary.

infographic

Methodology

This study was conducted for Apartment Guide using Google Consumer Surveys. The sample consists of 1,000 respondents in the United States. The survey was conducted in November 2019.

References:

  • Safewise
  • U.S. Department of Justice
  • State Laws
  • FBI 1, 2, 3, 4
  • Wiley
  • Safe At Last

The post Home Burglary Statistics: How Safe Are You? appeared first on Apartment Living Tips – Apartment Tips from ApartmentGuide.com.

Source: apartmentguide.com

6 Credit Card Tips to Help Prepare for the Holidays

Is it too soon to start planning your end-of-year holiday events? That may be debatable but we all know how quick retailers are to taking advantage of increased sales brought on by holiday shoppers. With Thanksgiving just around the corner most retailers are already advertising for their big shopping events and Black Friday deals. If […]

The post 6 Credit Card Tips to Help Prepare for the Holidays appeared first on Credit Absolute.

Source: creditabsolute.com

Prepare for Holiday Shopping with These Timely Credit Tips

According to a YouGov Parent Survey in 2019, a quarter of parents entered the 2019 holiday shopping seasonstill paying down debt related to 2018 holiday spending. Deloitte numbers put holidayretail salesgrowth in 2019 at 4.1% year-over-year. In 2020, Deloitte predicts growth of between 1% and 1.5% year-over-year for the holiday season.

It might be that some people no longer want to pay for holiday gifts, decorations and food a year down the road. But it’s also true that the COVID-19 pandemic has hit consumerwallets and some people might be cutting back this year.

That doesn’t mean that people aren’t shopping. Google and other thought leaders note that changes to shopping habits and the need for social distancing and other measures will likely spread the holiday shopping season out longer. Shoppers are also likely to turn to online shopping.

With a ton of shopping opportunities, a longer holiday shopping season and pent-up pandemic energy, it might be easy to overspend and create debt you’ll deal with into the future. Follow these tips to prepare for holiday shopping so you can protect your financial standing, save money and make the most of the resources you have this season.

1. Check your credit scores

Begin by checking your credit scores and reports. They tell you where you stand if you want to apply for credit. They also give you a baseline of where you are so you know if your score goes up or down later with no explanation.

An unexplained drop in your credit score can be a sign your financial information is compromised. Unfortunately, the holidays are prime time for many scammers. Using a service, such as ExtraCredit’s Track It feature to keep tabs on 28 of your FICO scores, helps you know when you need to act to protect your credit.

2. Ask for a credit limit increase

If you have existing credit cards and you’re a cardholder in good standing, the months prior to the holidays can be a good time to ask for a credit limit increase. You’re not asking so you can spend more-it’s typically advisable to keep spending in line with your budget no matter how much credit you have.

You’re asking for a higher limit so you can spend what you already planned to without hurting your credit utilization. Credit utilization is the second-most important factor in determining your credit score-second only to payment history. It’s the ratio between your credit limit and how much of that credit you have used.

If you have a card with a limit of $1,000 and you spend $300, that’s a utilization rate of 30%. But if you get approved for a credit limit of $2,000 and you spend $300, that’s a utilization rate of only 15%, which is better for your score.

3. Apply for a credit cardwith a 0% APR introductory offer

Those with good or excellent credit might want to consider applying for a card with a 0% APR introductory offer. If you qualify for such a card, you typically have one or two years to pay off purchases made during the introductory period without accruing any interest.

This can be a way to finance your entire holiday without paying anything more for the privilege of doing so. However, it’s still important to maintain your budget and not overspend just because you won’t be paying the balance off until later. Otherwise, you make this season’s holiday festivities next season’s problem.

4. Pay down debt before-and after-the holidays

Speaking of last season’s debt: If you can pay it down before you start spending this season, that’s a great accomplishment. It also frees up your credit and your budget so you can better enjoy the current holiday season. If you’re paying $100 a month on your debt, that’s $100 a month that might go toward gifts or celebrations that you don’t have to put on a card this year.

If you do use credit to pay for the 2020 holidays, have a plan for paying it down as soon as possible. That’s especially true with 0% interest cards. The longer you wait, the greater the chance you’ll miss the introductory period and potentially be on the hook for a lot of interest expense.

5. Create a holiday spending budget

Whether you’re using cash or credit-or a mix of both-enter the 2020 holiday shopping season with a plan. Take an honest look at your personal budget. If you don’t have a budget, create one before you move forward. Then decide how much you can realistically spend during the holidays.

Consider which gifts you want to buy and which events you want to host or attend. You might not be able to do everything, and that’s OK. Be honest with yourself, your family and your friends about what you can afford to do with your time and money this year.

Then make a list and assign each item a monetary budget. That can include:

  • Gifts as a total
  • Gift extras, such as wrapping and tags
  • Shipping, both for receiving items you buy and for shipping gifts to others
  • Food and drinks
  • Travel
  • Decor
  • General festivities, such as tickets to holiday events

Once you assign a dollar amount to a category, stick to it. That’s a good idea even if you’re spending with credit.

6. Align budgeted spendingwith credit cardrewards

Once you know how much you want to spend, decide how best to spend it. If you’re using credit cards for the holidays, check your accounts to see if any offer cash back or rewards points. If they do, double-check which categories or stores you can shop in to earn the most points with each card.

For example, some travel rewards cards offer 6x points when you shop at supermarkets. You could use such a card to cover the food-and-drink portion of your holiday budget and reap the biggest rewards possible from that spending. You might also be able to maximize rewards when purchasing gift cards.

7. Guard your financial information and identity

As you enjoy holiday shopping, be on guard. Don’t use debit card PIN numbers unless you have to, and shield the keypad when you enter your information. Keep a close eye on your wallet or purse, and check your credit card statements regularly to ensure all charges are yours. You can also use ExtraCredit’s Guard It feature to help keep your identity and account information safe during and beyond the season.

Sign up for ExtraCredit today!

The post Prepare for Holiday Shopping with These Timely Credit Tips appeared first on Credit.com.

Source: credit.com

When Is the Best Time to Buy a Car?

Best Time to Buy a Car

Timing is everything and when it comes to buying a car, that saying couldn’t be more true. Negotiating and haggling with car salesmen can reduce the price of what you have to pay for a new whip. But if you want to get the best deal on a car, you’ll need to know when to show up to the dealership. Whether you’re buying a used vehicle or a brand new ride, we’ll tell you the best time of year to buy a car. Being that the purchase of a car is rather pricey, consider meeting with a financial advisor in your area to discuss your finances beforehand.

When Is the Best Time to Buy a New Car?

If you’re on a budget, one of the best times to buy a new car is the end of a model season. New car models are often introduced each year between late summer and early fall. While you might miss out on some new features, buying a new car in August or early September may save you some money.

Waiting until the end of the year to buy a new car can work in your favor as well. Many car dealers offer year-end sales in an effort to get rid of older vehicles and make room for new inventory. Buying a new car on a holiday like Christmas Eve or New Year’s Eve is another way to get a deep discount.

If you can’t wait until December to get a new car, you might want to buy a car at the end of the month or the end of a quarter. If a salesperson hasn’t sold very many vehicles in weeks, he or she might be willing to compromise and lower the price of the car you want to buy. Even if a salesman has managed to sell multiple cars throughout the month, he might want to close one last deal in order to meet a sales goal or score a bonus.

Shopping for a car at the end of the day may or may not be effective. If you stop by a dealership an hour before it’s set to close, a salesperson may be open to negotiating so that he or she can end the day on a high note. But if he or she is used to working long hours, your sales associate may not be that flexible.

The Best Time to Buy a Used Car

Best Time to Buy a Car

A recent study from iseecars.com ranked the best times to buy a used car. At the top of their list are holidays including Black Friday, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving and Columbus Day. The months of November and December are also considered good times to purchase a used car.

According to the study, the months of April, May and June are some of the worst times to buy a used car. Specifically, Easter, Mother’s Day and Father’s Day are bad days for used-car buyers. But the No. 1 worst day to purchase a used car is the Fourth of July.

When Not to Buy a New Car

Generally, one of the worst times to buy a new car is in the spring. During this time of year, you’ll see more people on car lots looking to soak up some sun and cash in their tax refunds. Other bad times to shop for new cars are whenever a particular vehicle is popular among consumers and whenever a new car model has been released.

Some people seem to think that buying a car on a rainy day is a good idea. But that approach usually doesn’t work. In fact, you can expect car dealerships to be filled with people when there’s bad weather simply because people tend to believe that they’ll find great deals on rainy days.

Bottom Line 

Best Time to Buy a Car

The best time of year to buy a car ultimately depends on your personal preferences and how much you’re willing to spend on a vehicle. If you’re rolling in dough and you want your car to have top-of-the-line features and amenities, you might want to buy a car as soon as a new model comes out. But if you’re trying to shave hundreds of dollars off your purchase price, experts say that it’s best to head to the dealership at the end of a period in the fall or winter, like the end of the month, quarter or year.

Our advice? When it comes to buying cars and getting your way at the dealership, it helps to know what you’re looking for. Doing plenty of research and knowing the make and model that you want your car to have can make it easier to figure out when to purchase your new vehicle.

Tips for Taking Care of Your Finances

  • If you find yourself having some financial struggles, perhaps it’s time to have an outside resource step in to help you out. Financial advisors typically have extensive experience in a number of important areas of finance, like tax planning, retirement planning, budget planning and more. SmartAsset’s advisor matching tool can set you up with as many as three suitable advisors in just 5 minutes. Get started now.
  • The best way to manage your money on both a short- and long-term scale is to create a firm budget. SmartAsset’s budget calculator can help you figure out exactly where you’re overspending.

Photo credit: ©iStock.com/cosmin4000, ©iStock.com/ViewApart, ©iStock.com/kali9

The post When Is the Best Time to Buy a Car? appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

Source: smartasset.com

5 Tips for a Memorable Holiday Card for Your Business

In a time when most communication takes place online, receiving a personal holiday card in the mail is a welcome treat—and one that can help build stronger business relationships while supporting your company’s brand.

So how can you be sure that your company’s holiday card earns a place on the mantel or card display and isn’t just tossed in the recycling bin? Start with a high-quality card from a well-known stationer like Crane, and then remember these tips.

1. Reflect Your Brand

Although sending a holiday card spreads cheer and acknowledges the spirit of the season, it’s a marketing tool ultimately, giving you a chance to thank your customers for their business and maintain top-of-mind awareness. Therefore, it’s important that the design you choose reflects your company brand and sends the right message to customers. Try to choose card designs that align with your brand colors, imagery, fonts, and overall corporate identity. That doesn’t mean you have to stick to boring or conservative designs, but you should consider the message you’re sending. Even conservative businesses like accountants or attorneys can incorporate whimsical or colorful designs into their cards when done appropriately.

2. Consider a Photo

Photo cards are among the most popular design choices for holiday cards. After all, who doesn’t love seeing the smiling faces of friends and family that they might see all that often? Photo cards are also appropriate for businesses and are likely to get the recipients to look more closely at them. Photo cards work well both for businesses where customers have regular contact with your team and for those where your customers might not see you and want to put faces to names. They are also a great choice for family businesses. Including a family photo on the holiday card supports your “family-owned” brand and a personal touch to the card.

3. Make it Personal

Speaking of adding a personal touch, the most memorable holiday cards are those that have a personal touch. Nothing will send your card to the bin faster than a preprinted card that was clearly a mass mailing. People want to feel special and acknowledged, and adding a personal touch to the card creates that feeling. Hand-signing cards is ideal, but not always practical, but many printing companies can add digital signatures that mimic the look of a signature. Another option is to have your team send cards to specific clients with a personalized message thanking them for their business or mentioning a specific memory or project.

Sending business holiday cards is a key part of your marketing, so take the time to do it right.

4. Take Care with Messaging

Understanding your customer base and being culturally sensitive is important all the time, but in particular during the holidays. It’s important to choose holiday cards and write messages that are sensitive to your customers' religious and cultural preferences. This means avoiding cards with overtly religious messages or focused on the religious aspects of the season, instead opt for more neutral designs and greetings. The primary exceptions are if your business is devoted to a specific religion (eg. a Christian bookstore), if you are certain that your customer base is of a specific faith, or if you’re sending greetings for a holiday you celebrate (for example, if you’re of the Jewish faith and sending cards for Hanukkah). Even then, it’s best to opt for cards that have more subtle religious imagery and messages. If you’re unsure, choose a more universal “Season’s Greetings” or “Happy Holidays” theme.

5. Mail Carefully

There’s no point in putting time, effort, and money into your holiday card only to have many of them returned undeliverable because you have incorrect addresses. Devote some time to updating your mailing list, adding new contacts, removing old or outdated addresses, and removing duplicates. If you’re sending cards to contacts and clients at other companies, make sure that the recipients are still with the company and that you have their titles correct.

This means that you should begin working on your holiday cards well in advance. You might not be thinking about the holidays yet in October, but it’s best to get your company cards in the mail as close to Thanksgiving as possible. Not only does getting your card in the hands of your contacts early make it more memorable—it’s not going to get lost in the pile of cards filling mailboxes the week before Christmas—but it also ensures that people receive them before they head out of the office for the holidays. Many people take time off in the days before and after Christmas, and if your cards are mailed late, they won’t be seen until after the New Year. If you are running late with your holiday cards, consider sending New Year’s greetings instead.

Sending business holiday cards is a key part of your marketing, so take the time to do it right. Your customers will be happy to receive them and remember your company in the year to come.

Source: quickanddirtytips.com

Must Have Tools for Thanksgiving Dinner Prep This Year

Tools for cooking Thanksgiving Dinner | Thanksgiving dinner | Kitchen tools

We don’t have to tell you that Thanksgiving looks and feels a lot different this year.  This may be the first you you are cooking the big meal yourself.  While we wish we could be there to help, the next best thing is to share with you our favorite tools for prepping a Thanksgiving feast.  And once you’ve got all the tools ordered, be sure to check out our Pinterest boards, for all of our favorite recipes both for Thanksgiving dinner and for the accompanying drinks.

 

fat separator–ALL THE GRAVY-NONE OF THE GREASE

Buy Now: $9.99

 

BRINING=ACING THE TURKEY GAME

Buy Now: $26.74

 

SAVE STOVETOP SPACE -SLOW COOK YOUR MASHED POTATOES

Buy Now: $49.99

 

BECAUSE YOU’RE PROBABLY NOT EATING THAT WHOLE PIE IN ONE SITTING…BUT WE WON’T JUDGE IF YOU DO

Buy Now: $9.99

 

GET THE RIGHT TEMP

Buy Now: $9.99

Ready to find your next apartment?

Get Free Matches Now

BASTE LIKE A PRO

Buy Now: $16.99

BECAUSE MANHANDLING A HOT TURKEY IS NOT A GOOD LOOK

Buy Now: $12.98

Stainless Steel Trash & Recycling Center

Buy Now: $92.99

Read Must Have Tools for Thanksgiving Dinner Prep This Year on Apartminty.

Source: blog.apartminty.com